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Isabelle möchte nicht viel. Nur leben. Sie möchte ganz einfach leben. Aber sie hat Krebs. Wir haben per Mail von ihr erfahren und dann recherchiert.

Isabelle braucht Hilfe.




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96 Prozent der Bürger wollen Verbot unwirksamer Medikamente



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Reinwald paid 7 Euros for each bottle of "Rerum" and sold it to his dealers for 302 Euro a piece. Enduser price: 529 Euros per bottle.
Now, what do you think about the other "products" by Reinwald and his likes: Do you think they pay more than 7 Euros per bottle?
Can you imagine how badly you are cheated with a totally worthless shit they buy for 7 Euros and sell it to you for more than 500 Euros per bottle?


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Halifax anti-vaxx chiropractor Dena Churchill surrendered her licence in January and entered into a settlement agreement with the college in which she admits the charge of being "professionally incompetent as a result of incompetence arising out of mental incapacity."

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BEAT THE PHARMAMAFIA! DON'T LET THEM CASH IN $ 800000 !

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Große Sperraktion gegen Netzterroristen

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Author Topic: DO NOT SELL OR BUY HOMEOPATHY!  (Read 236 times)

worelia

  • Boltbender
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 421
DO NOT SELL OR BUY HOMEOPATHY!
« on: January 14, 2019, 03:39:34 AM »

[*quote*]
Subject: [chd] Consumer Health Digest #19-02, January 13, 2018
Consumer Health Digest #19-02
January 13, 2018

Consumer Health Digest is a free weekly e-mail newsletter edited by William M. London, Ed.D., M.P.H
http://www.calstatela.edu/faculty/william-m-london
., with help from Stephen Barrett, M.D
http://www.quackwatch.org/10Bio/bio.html
. It summarizes scientific reports; legislative developments; enforcement actions; news reports; Web site evaluations; recommended and nonrecommended books; and other information relevant to consumer protection and consumer decision-making. Its primary focus is on health, but occasionally it includes non-health scams and practical tips.

###
Excessive cancer drug pricing quantified

A team of researchers studied all 99 cancer drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration from 1989 to 2017 for which sales data were available for more than half the years since approval. They found that for every dollar in research and development spending, the median income return to the companies by the end of 2017 was found to be $14.50 with a range of $3.30 to $55.10. By the end of 2017, 73 of the drugs included in their analysis had fully recovered the median research and development cost. For those 73 drugs, the median time to generate sales income to fully cover risk-adjusted research and development cost was found to be only 3 years with a range of 2 to 10 years.
[Tay-Teo, K and others. Comparison of sales income and research and development costs for FDA-approved cancer drugs sold by originator drug companies
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2720075
. JAMA Network Open 2(1):e186875, 2019] The researchers concluded:

Cancer drugs, through high prices, have generated incomes for the companies far in excess of research and development costs; lowering prices of cancer drugs and facilitating greater competition are essential for improving patient access, health system's financial sustainability, and future innovation.

###

"Complementary medicines" position statement issued

The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (PSA) has issued a position statement describing the role of pharmacists related to "complementary medicines."
[Pharmaceutical Society of Australia. Complementary medicines position statement
https://my.psa.org.au/s/sfdcpage/%2Fapex%2FAsKnowledgeArticle%3FartType%3DStandard__kav%26artId%3Dka17F0000000zFwQAI
. October 2018] Key points in the statement include:

PSA's Code of Ethics for Pharmacists
https://www.psa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/PSA-Code-of-Ethics-2017.pdf
 states that a pharmacist will only purchase, supply or promote any complementary medicine or herbal remedy where there is credible evidence of efficacy and the benefit of use outweighs the risk.
PSA does not support the provision or promotion of homeopathy
https://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/homeo.html
 products by pharmacists.
The pharmacist's first priority is the health and wellbeing of the consumer. When discussing the use of complementary medicines, the pharmacist must ensure the consumer is provided with the best available information about the current evidence for efficacy, as well as information on any potential side effects, drug interactions and risks of harm, to assist in making informed decisions.
A pharmacist respects the consumer's choice. When a consumer chooses to use a product with limited evidence, the pharmacist must advise on the risks of rejecting or delaying treatments for which there is good evidence for safety and effectiveness.

###

Detoxing debunked

Vox has published a brief article accompanied by an informative four-minute YouTube video explaining that unless you are a heroin addict or are at risk of alcohol poisoning, you probably don't need a 'detox.' [Belluz J, Haubursin C. Products that promise "detox" are a sham. Yes, all of them
https://www.vox.com/2016/9/13/12894190/detox-cleanse-products-scam
. Vox. Jan 2, 2019]

###
Fluoridation benefits and safety reaffirmed

Public Health Ontario has completed an evidence review that reaffirms the benefits and safety of optimally fluoridated water. The report's key messages are:

The existing literature (to May 10, 2017) indicates that mild dental fluorosis (generally unnoticeable white specks on teeth) is the only adverse effect experienced from consuming optimally fluoridated water (Health Canada recommends the optimal level of fluoride in water at 0.7 mg/L).
Infant formulas prepared with optimally fluoridated water may increase the chance of the mild form of dental fluorosis if they are the child's main food source. If prevention of mild fluorosis is desired, then infant formula can be occasionally prepared with low-fluoridated bottled water and early exposure to other forms of fluoride (including fluoride toothpaste, fluoride rinse, and fluoride supplements) should be monitored.
The report also notes that the recommended optimal level considers the dose-response relationship between fluoride intake and health effects and provides a trade-off that maximizes benefits and minimizes adverse effects. [Public Health Ontario. Evidence review for adverse health effects of drinking optimally fluoridated water (2010-2017)
https://www.dentalwatch.org/fl/ca_evidence_review_2017.pdf
. October 2018]

Dental fluorosis is an alteration of dental enamel caused by ingestion of more than the optimal amount of fluoride during tooth development. In mild fluorosis, the teeth may appear whiter than otherwise but are neither unattractive nor structurally damaged.
[Barrett S., Baratz RS. Dental fluorosis: much ado about nothing
http://www.dentalwatch.org/fl/fluorosis.html
. Dental Watch, Jan 13, 2019]

=================================

Stephen Barrett, M.D.
Consumer Advocate
287 Fearrington Post
Pittsboro, NC 27312

Telephone: (919) 533-6009

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[*/quote*]
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worelia

  • Boltbender
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 421
Re: DO NOT SELL OR BUY HOMEOPATHY!
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2019, 04:08:23 AM »

Pharmaceutical Society of Australia. Complementary medicines position statement

https://my.psa.org.au/s/sfdcpage/%2Fapex%2FAsKnowledgeArticle%3FartType%3DStandard__kav%26artId%3Dka17F0000000zFwQAI
[*quote*]
Complementary medicines

19/11/2018 | Position Statements, | Complementary medicines

This is available for download as a PDF: Complementary Medicines Position.pdf

https://www.psa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/PSA-Code-of-Ethics-2017.pdf

[*/quote*]


PSA's Code of Ethics for Pharmacists
https://www.psa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/PSA-Code-of-Ethics-2017.pdf

[*quote*]
PAGE 1





Complementary medicines
OCTOBER
2018
Position statement


About PSA

PSA is the peak national professional
pharmacy organisation representing
Australia’s approximately 30,000
pharmacists 1 working in all sectors and
locations.

PSA’s core functions include:
•    providing high quality continuing
professional development, education
and practice support to pharmacists
•    developing and advocating standards
and guidelines to inform and enhance
pharmacists’ practice
•    representing pharmacists’ role as
frontline health professionals.

PSA is also a registered training
organisation and offers qualifications
including certificate and diploma-
level courses tailored for pharmacists,
pharmacy assistants and interns.
It should be noted that PSA is not a
regulatory body.

Summary of PSA’s position

Complementary medicines are a group
of diverse products with varying levels of
evidence to support their safety and efficacy.
Complementary medicines may have a role
in the management or treatment of some
conditions, and may be used as an adjunctive
therapy with conventional medicines.

Pharmacists play an important role in
providing consumers with evidence-based
advice on complementary medicines in
accordance with Quality Use of Medicines
(QUM) principles. This is consistent with
the Pharmacy Board of Australia’s advice2
that one aspect of good practice involves
“facilitating the quality use of therapeutic
products based on the best available
evidence and the patient or client’s needs”.

Pharmacists can assist consumers
make informed decisions regarding
complementary medicines to promote
QUM and responsible self-medication.

When discussing the use of complementary
medicines, the pharmacist must ensure the
consumer is provided with the best
available information about the current
evidence for efficacy, as well as information
on any potential side effects, drug
interactions and risks of harm.

Pharmacists respect the autonomy and
right of the consumer to take responsibility
for their own treatment. When a consumer
chooses to use a product with limited
evidence, the pharmacist must advise
the consumer on the risks of rejecting or
delaying treatments for which there is good
evidence for safety and effectiveness.

PSA strongly encourages consumers when
considering taking a complementary
medicine to consult with their pharmacist
or general practitioner for evidence-based
information about the product. Consumers
taking complementary medicines should also
raise this with their pharmacist and general
practitioner to minimise the possibility of
adverse effects such as interactions with
another medicine.


PAGE 2

PSA’s Code of Ethics for Pharmacists3 states
that a pharmacist will only purchase,
supply or promote any complementary
medicine or herbal remedy where there
is credible evidence of efficacy and the
benefit of use outweighs the risk.

PSA does not support the provision or
promotion of homeopathy products by
pharmacists given the findings of the
National Health and Medical Research
Council (NHMRC) that there are no health
conditions for which there is reliable
evidence that homeopathy is effective.


Background

Use of complementary medicines in Australia

In Australia, medicinal products containing
herbs (plants), vitamins, minerals,
nutritional supplements, probiotics,
or aromatherapy or homeopathic
preparations are referred to as
complementary, alternative, natural or
traditional medicines. 4
Reports suggest that the use of
complementary medicines in Australia
is continuing to increase. A 2005 survey
indicated that 68.9% of Australians used
a complementary medicine at least once
a year. 5 A survey of the complementary
medicines industry stated that revenue in
2017 was $4.9 billion. 6

Regulation of complementary medicines

Medicines in Australia are regulated by the
Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA)
and must be listed or registered on the
Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods
(ARTG). 7
Registered medicines have been assessed
for safety, quality and efficacy and are
identified by an “AUST R” number on their
label. 7 All prescription medicines and
most over-the-counter medicines are
registered on the ARTG, as well as some
complementary medicines.
Listed medicines have been assessed for
safety and quality only and are identified
by an “AUST L” number on their label. 7 They
include vitamin and mineral supplements,
and herbal medicines. These medicines
must only use low-risk, pre-approved
ingredients 7 and indications drawn
exclusively from a list of pre-approved
‘permitted indications’. 8
In 2018, a new ‘assessed listed medicines’
pathway for complementary medicines
was established to allow intermediate
level indications subject to premarket TGA
assessment of efficacy evidence. 9

While products sold in Australia are
regulated through the TGA, products sold
on international websites may not meet
the standards of safety or quality enforced
through the TGA – as such, by purchasing
these products, consumers may be
exposing themselves to risk. 10

Levels of evidence

The strength of evidence for medicine
efficacy varies and can be classified
according to the hierarchy adopted by the
NHMRC. 11 For a medicine to be registered
on the ARTG it must be supported by
Level I evidence. 12 Evidence required for
medicines to be listed on the ARTG varies
between medicines and associated claims;
however the evidence base can range from
Level III-1 to Level IV. 12
It is important to acknowledge that lack of
evidence is not analogous to evidence of
no effect. Further, anecdotal reports are not
considered as evidence.





Homeopathy

PSA endorses the NHMRC report which
found that there are no health conditions
for which there is reliable evidence
that homeopathy is effective and that
homeopathy should not be used to
treat health conditions that are chronic,
serious, or could become serious. 13 The
NHMRC mentions that consumers may
put their health at risk if they reject or
delay treatments for which there is good
evidence for safety and effectiveness. 13
Consistent with the above, PSA does not
support the provision or promotion of
homeopathy products by pharmacists.


The pharmacist’s role in complementary medicines

Pharmacists, as medicines and medication
management experts, have a fundamental
role in ensuring consumers have
access to safe and effective medicines.
Complementary medicines may have a
role in the management or treatment of
some conditions, and may be used as an
adjunctive therapy with conventional
medicines.

The pharmacist’s first priority is the health
and wellbeing of the consumer. 3 When
discussing the use of complementary
medicines, the pharmacist must ensure
the consumer is provided with the best
available information about the current
evidence for efficacy, as well as information
on any potential side effects, drug
interactions and risks of harm, to assist in
making informed decisions. 4


PAGE 3

Pharmacists respect the autonomy
and right of the consumer to actively
participate in decision making. 3
Pharmacists appreciate the consumer’s
cultural and social beliefs regarding the use
of complementary medicines, and respect
their desire to take responsibility for their
own treatment. PSA advocates strongly for
a partnership approach to promote QUM
and responsible self-medication.
A pharmacist respects the consumer’s
choice. 3 When a consumer chooses to
use a product with limited evidence, the
pharmacist must advise on the risks of
rejecting or delaying treatments for which
there is good evidence for safety and
effectiveness.
Pharmacists should also support pharmacy
assistants to understand the importance
of evidence informing the use of
complementary medicines.
The consumer’s role in
complementary medicines
A study published in 2012 reported
that 48% of respondents did not tell
their pharmacist or doctor about other
medicines they were taking. 14 Another
earlier report showed that the three
most common sources of information on
complementary medicines, as reported by
consumers were: family and friends, the
internet and health food shop workers. 15
To ensure best possible health outcomes,
PSA strongly encourages all consumers
considering taking a complementary
medicine to first consult their pharmacist
for evidence-based advice. Consumers are
also encouraged to notify their pharmacist
and general practitioner if they are
taking a complementary medicine, as
there is potential for interaction between
conventional or prescribed medicines and
complementary medicines.





References

1.    Pharmacy Board of Australia. Registrant data. 30 Jun 2018.
At:
http://www.pharmacyboard.gov.au/About/Statistics.aspx

2.    Pharmacy Board of Australia. Code of conduct for
pharmacists. Mar 2014. At:
https://www.pharmacyboard.gov.au/codes-guidelines/code-of-conduct.aspx

3.    Pharmaceutical Society of Australia. Code of ethics for
pharmacists. Feb 2017. At:
https://svrweba.psa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/PSA-Code-of-Ethics-2017.pdf

4.    Sansom LN, ed. Australian pharmaceutical formulary and
handbook. 24th ed. Canberra: Pharmaceutical Society of
Australia; 2018. pp. 486-9.

5.    Xue CC, Zhang AL, Lin V, et al. Complementary and
alternative medicine use in Australia: a national population-
based survey. J Altern Complement Med 2007;13(6):643-50.

6.    Complementary Medicines Australia. Australia’s
complementary medicines industry snapshot 2018.
At:
http://www.cmaustralia.org.au/resources/Documents/Australian%20Complementary%20Medicines%20Industry%20snapshot%202018_English.pdf

7.    Therapeutic Goods Administration. Registered and listed
medicines. At:
https://www.tga.gov.au/registered-and-listed-medicines

8.    Therapeutic Goods Administration. Permitted indications for
listed medicines. 7 Mar 2018. At:
https://www.tga.gov.au/permitted-indications-listed-medicines

9.    Therapeutic Goods Administration. Assessed listed
medicines pathway for complementary medicines. 27
Mar 2018. At:
http://www.tga.gov.au/assessed-listed-medicines-pathway-complementary-medicines

10.   Therapeutic Goods Administration. Buying medicines and
medical devices online. 27 Jun 2016. At:
http://www.tga.gov.au/community-qa/buying-medicines-and-medical-devices-online

11.   Sansom op. cit. pp. 631-6.

12.   Therapeutic Goods Administration. Evidence guidelines:
Guidelines on the evidence required to support indications
for listed complementary medicines. Version 2.1. Jul 2014.
At:
http://www.tga.gov.au/file/6086/download

13.   National Health and Medical Research Council. NHMRC
statement on homeopathy and NHMRC information paper
– Evidence on the effectiveness of homeopathy for treating
health conditions. 2015. At:
https://nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/publications/evidence-effectiveness-homeopathy-treating-health-conditions

14.   Morgan TK, Williamson M, Pirotta M, et al. A national census
of medicines use: a 24-hour snapshot of Australians aged 50
years and older. Med J Aust 2012;196(1):50-3.

15.   Williamson M, Tudball J, Toms M, et al. Information use and
needs of complementary medicines users. Sydney: National
Prescribing Service; 2008. At:
https://westernsydney.edu.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/537406/Information_Use_and_Needs_of_Complementary_Medicines_Users.pdf


PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA

Level 1, 17 Denison Street
Deakin ACT 2600

PO Box 42
Deakin West ACT 2600

P: 1300 369 772
F: 1300 369 771
E: psa.nat@psa.org.au
http://www.psa.org.au

[*/quote*]


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