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Author Topic: 'This department does not hold a record of an individual with the details shown'  (Read 418 times)

Munterbunt

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 372

Our feathered friends brought electric information on Isaac Goiz Duran: The University of Oxford in the United Kingdom says:

University of Oxford, Oxford, Great Britain:

"This department does not hold a record of an individual with the details shown above."



We already knew this. But this is one more piece of proof, one more nail for the coffin of THE BIG LIE ISAAC GOIZ DURAN.

The scan:



The plaintext:

[*quote*]
UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
University Offices, Wellington Square, Oxford OX1 2JD

Ref. FOI/20211006/1
25 October 2021

Reply to request for information under Freedom of Information of Act

Your Ref: Email dated 5 October 2021
Request: Did this "Dr. Isaac Goiz Durán" ever receive any academic title or award by the
University of Oxford? And, if that were the case, which titles and/or awards did he
receive, and why?



Dear MXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

I write in reply to your email requesting the above information.

We have consulted with the University’s Degree Conferrals Office (which holds records of students who have
matriculated to the University, and any degrees awarded to them by the University). This department does
not hold a record of an individual with the details shown above.


Yours sincerely,
FOI OXFORD
[*/quote*]


[A spendiert. ET]
« Last Edit: October 27, 2021, 05:12:36 AM by el_Typo »
Logged

Julian

  • Boltbender
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2214

An earlier bird had the same idea and sent a mail to the University of Oxford. To the real one, of course. Here is the report:


http://www.marisolcollazos.es/noticias-criminologia/?m=201307&paged=2
http://www.marisolcollazos.es/noticias-criminologia/?p=12324
(translated with deepl.com)

[*quote*]
Oxford University speaks out on 'medical biomagnetism' by alleged doctor
Published 2013/07/13 | By admin
Criminology News. Oxford University speaks out on the "medical biomagnetism" of an alleged doctor. Marisol Collazos Soto

Isaac Goiz (the "father" of this "discipline") has been presented on countless occasions in the media as having a doctorate in "Bioenergetic Medicine" or "Medical Biomagnetism" from the "University of Oxford" or "Oxford University". A clear example of this can be seen in the following video obtained from the Chilean biomagnetism promotion site
ohani.cl
http://www.ohani.cl/biomagnetismo_testimonios_en_TV.htm

From the CAE blog they sent an email to the Faculty of Medicine at Oxford University in England letting them know that Isaac Goiz was presenting himself in the media as holding a PhD qualification from that University (or at least lending himself to being associated with that University) and asking them to publish an official refutation of this "therapy". The press officer of the Faculty of Medicine, Mr. Jonathan Wood, responded to my request and sent me the following OFFICIAL statement from the REAL University of Oxford (the bold letters are mine):

"Statement from the University of Oxford

Mr Isaac GoizThe University of Oxford has no record of Mr Isaac Goiz or Isaac Goiz Duran having received a PhD or any other degree from the University.
The UK Government has provided a list of recognised higher education bodies and institutions with higher degree awarding powers on the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills website at
http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/
. Bircham International University and Oxford International University do not appear on this list
University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk
01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media "


Enlarge in: CAE
[*/quote*]


The original text:

http://www.marisolcollazos.es/noticias-criminologia/?m=201307&paged=2
http://www.marisolcollazos.es/noticias-criminologia/?p=12324

[*quote*]
La Universidad de Oxford se pronuncia respecto al “biomagnetismo médico” de un supuesto médico
Publicado 2013/07/13 | Por admin
Noticias criminología. La Universidad de Oxford se pronuncia respecto al “biomagnetismo médico” de un supuesto médico. Marisol Collazos Soto

Isaac Goiz (el “padre” de esta “disciplina”) ha sido presentado en incontables ocasiones en medios de comunicación como poseedor de un doctorado en “Medicina Bioenergética” o “Biomagnetismo Médico” de la “Universidad de Oxford” u “Oxford University”. Un ejemplo claro de esto se puede ver en el siguiente video obtenido desde el sitio de promoción del biomagnetismo chileno ohani.cl.

Desde el blog CAE  mandaron un email a la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Oxford en Inglaterra haciéndoles saber que Isaac Goiz se presentaba en medios de prensa como poseedor de una calificación de doctorado de esa Universidad (o al menos prestándose a que se le asociara con esa Universidad) y solicitándoles que publicaran una refutación oficial de esta “terapia”. El oficial de prensa de la Facultad de Medicina el Sr. Jonathan Wood, respondió a mi petición y me envió la siguiente declaración OFICIAL de la VERDADERA Universidad de Oxford (las negritas son mías):
«Declaración de la Universidad de Oxford

Sr Isaac GoizLa Universidad de Oxford no tiene registro de que el Sr Isaac Goiz o Isaac Goiz Durán haya recibido un Doctorado (PhD) o ningún otro grado por parte de la Universidad.
El Gobierno del Reino Unido ha proveído una lista de cuerpos e Instituciones de educación superior reconocidos con poderes para otorgar grados superiores en el sitio web del Departamento para la Innovación, Universidades y Habilidades en http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/. La Bircham International University y la Oxford International University no aparecen en esta listaUniversity of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk 01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media
Ampliar en: CAE
[*/quote*]
Logged
StarCruiser http://WWW.ALLAXYS.COM
-----  Travelling beyond c   -----

Julian

  • Boltbender
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2214

The "CAE blog" holds a lot of information. Let's look at it.

https://0cae0.blogspot.com/2008/08/la-verdadera-universidad-de-oxford-se.html

TRANSLATED WITH DEEPL.COM:

[*quote*]
FALLS
CINICISM, AGNOSTICISM, ESCEPTICISM
.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 28, 2008

The real Oxford University pronounces itself on Isaac Goiz Durán's "medical biomagnetism".

A few months ago the author of this blog together with Carlos Riquelme of the Chile Liberal blog
http://chileliberal.blogspot.com/
denounced the fraudulent and pseudoscientific activities of Isaac Goiz Durán to the Chilean Medical Association.
http://0cae0.blogspot.com/2008/04/advertencia-los-biomagnetistas-su-gur.html
using as a precedent the warning issued by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Costa Rica,
http://www.confemel.com/cartelera/amcr-070205.htm
institution that denounced Goiz for fraud and illegal exercise of the medical profession.

After 4 months with no response from the Chilean Medical Association (and one visit by Goiz to Chile and another being planned),
http://www.ohani.cl/curso_de_biomagnetismo.htm
I decided to turn to the real Oxford University for a pronouncement on the "discipline" of medical biomagnetism.

Isaac Goiz (the "father" of this "discipline") has been presented on countless occasions in the media as having a PhD in "Bioenergetic Medicine" or "Medical Biomagnetism" from the "University of Oxford" or "Oxford University". A clear example of this can be seen in the following video obtained from the Chilean biomagnetism promotion site ohani.cl.


Only a few sites make it clear that it is the "Oxford International University" which we have already explained has nothing to do with the real Oxford University and which has been accused of academic fraud in Mexico.

Last July I sent an email to the Faculty of Medicine at Oxford University in England making them aware that Isaac Goiz was presenting himself in the press as having a doctoral qualification from that University (or at least lending himself to association with that University) and asking them to publish an official refutation of this "therapy". The press officer of the Faculty of Medicine, Mr. Jonathan Wood, responded to my request and sent me the following OFFICIAL statement from the TRUE University of Oxford (the bold letters are mine):

"Statement from the University of Oxford
Mr Isaac Goiz

The University of Oxford has no record of Mr Isaac Goiz or Isaac Goiz Durán receiving a PhD or any other degree from the University.

The UK Government has provided a list of recognised higher education bodies and institutions with higher degree awarding powers on the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills website at http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/. Bircham International University and Oxford International University do not appear on this list.

University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk 01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media "


ORIGINAL TEXT:

"Statement from the University of Oxford
Mr Isaac Goiz
The University of Oxford has no record of Mr Isaac Goiz or Mr Isaac Goiz Durán receiving a PhD or any other degree from the University.
The UK government has provided a list of recognised UK bodies and higher education institutions with degree-awarding powers on the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills website at http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/. Neither Bircham International University nor Oxford International University appear on this list."
[/b]

With this statement it is more than clear that "Dr." Isaac Goiz HAS NO recognition whatsoever from one of the world's leading universities in the field of medicine and that furthermore "Oxford International University" is not authorised by the UK government to award academic degrees.

In addition, Professor Quentin Sattentau of the School of Pathology

Sir William Dunn of Oxford University, who is an expert on the AIDS virus, took the trouble to write a short rebuttal of biomagnetism (many have criticised me for condemning the therapy without being a doctor), which makes clear the OFFICIAL position of the prestigious Oxford University regarding Medical Biomagnetism: THIS PRACTICE IS NOT BASED ON SCIENCE OR MEDICINE AND IS COMPLETE NONSENSE.

The following is Professor Sattentau's rebuttal (bolded text is mine):

[***quote***]
------------------------------------------------------
"The best source of information I found on medical biomagnetism was the Cancun's first Wellness Center website.
http://groups.msn.com/CANCUNSFIRSTWELLNESSCENTER/biomagnetism.msnw_
. This website is based on Isaac Goiz's claims that biomagnetism has therapeutic benefit. It lumps together unreferenced quotes and unpublished work, mixes this with some technical sounding terms, and culminates with something that has no scientific or medical basis.

The following statements are in my opinion erroneous or misleading:

"In the 20th century, the effect and impact of magnetic field therapy on more than 200,000 people in more than 3000 scientific studies have been officially published."

I can find no trace in Medline, the primary international database for biomedical studies, of any connection between "biomagnetism" and "infectious diseases". In fact a search for the terms "biomagnetism" and "infectious disease" yielded zero results. I can only conclude from this that there are no properly conducted, peer-reviewed studies published on this subject. All references to "biomagnetism" in scientific papers in Medline are related to the use of biomagnetism as an imaging tool, as in the case of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

2. "This particular application of magnetic field therapy is based on the thesis of Dr. Beren-Meyer, who was a physiotherapist for astronauts, and who in 1988 gave a seminar on Biomagnetism, where the phenomenon of energetic organic pH was exposed".

I can find no reference to a Dr Beren-Meyer or his theory. The term "organic energetic pH phenomenon" has no scientific or medical meaning.

3. The website repeatedly mixes "tracing" and "diagnosis" with "treatment", without any justification or explanation. There is no explanation of how "diagnosis" or "treatment" is supposed to work.

4. "Medical biomagnetism defines charges, classifies them, organises, neutralises and cures. Symptoms decline".
This statement has no basis in medicine or science and is complete nonsense.
5. "The method works by forcing the charges into the organism so that the charges neutralise each other".
This statement has no basis in medicine or science and is complete nonsense.
6. "In general, common diseases are produced by a single Biomagnetic Pair. Infectious diseases are the result of the association of 2 or more Biomagnetic Pairs.

This statement has no basis in medicine or science and is complete nonsense.

7. "Research has shown that biomagnetic pairs are divided into 4 categories:
1- Regular pairs identify pathogenic organisms whether viruses, bacteria, fungi or parasites."
2- Special pairs identify alterations in tissues not supported by pathogenic organisms.
3-Dysfunctional pairs are those that affect glands and hormone production.
4- Reservoir pairs identify organs or tissues that support potentially pathogenic viruses and can keep them in reserve for an indefinite period of time, until an alteration in the body triggers it by sending it to its specific location.

This claim has no basis in medicine or science and is complete nonsense.

The claims made on this website represent the worst kind of misleading promotion, turning a series of unrelated scientific terms into something that could lead innocent readers to think that the claims are valid. The use of this pseudo-medical reasoning as a way to make money at the expense of people suffering from ill health strikes me as morally wrong.

The best alternative source of information I found is the article: "Magnetic healing, quackery, and the debate about the health effects of electromagnetic fields", Annals of Internal Medicine, 118, 376-383 (1993).
http://www.annals.org/cgi/content/full/118/5/376

I would like to see any claims made by the Cancun Wellness Centre about the beneficial effects of biomagnetism formally investigated by the Mexican Medical Association or a related professional body, so that they can be exposed for the scam that they are.

University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk
01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media
------------------------------------------------------
[***/quote***]


ORIGINAL TEXT


[***quote***]
------------------------------------------------------
Professor Quentin Sattentau of the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford comments on claims for ‘medical biomagnetism’ as an alternative therapy technique:

“The best source of information I found on medical biomagnetism was the website Cancun’s first wellness center,

https://becks.mackmultiples.co.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp,DanaInfo=147.183.1.169+?URL=http://groups.msn.com/CANCUNSFIRSTWELLNESSCENTER/biomagnetism.msnw_

. This website is based on Isaac Goiz's claims that biomagnetism is of therapeutic benefit. It brings together unreferenced citations and unpublished work, mixes this with some technical sounding terms, and comes up with something with no scientific or medical basis.

The following statements seem to me to be factually wrong or misleading:

1. “In the 20th Century, the effect and impact of magnetic field therapy on over 200,000 people in more than 3,000 scientific studies have been officially published.”

I can find no trace on Medline, the primary international database for biomedical studies, of any link between 'biomagnetism' and ‘infectious diseases’. Indeed a search of the terms ‘biomagnetism’ and ‘infectious disease’ turns up no hits.

I can only conclude that there are no properly carried out, peer-reviewed, published studies on the subject. All reference in Medline's scientific papers to ‘biomagnetism’ refers to the use of magnetism as an imaging tool, as in NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance).

2. “This particular application of magnetic field therapy is based on Dr. Beren-Meyer’s thesis, who was a physiotherapist for astronauts, and who in 1988 gave a seminar on biomagnetics, where the organic pH energetic phenomena was exposed.”

I can find no reference to Dr. Beren-Meyer or his theory.

The terms "organic pH energetic phenomena" have no scientific or medical meaning.

3. The website text repeatedly mixes up ‘scanning’ and ‘diagnosis’ with ‘treatment’, with no justification or explanation.

There is no explanation of how the ‘diagnosis’ or ‘treatment’ is supposed to work.

4. “It [medicinal biomagnetism] defines the charges, classifies them, organizes, neutralizes and heals. Symptoms decline.”

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

5. "The method works forcing the charges toward the inside of the organism so the charges neutralize themselves on their own".

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

6. "In general, common diseases are produced by a single Bio-Magnetic Pair (BMP). Complex diseases are the result of association of two or more BMPs".

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

7. "The Research has shown that the BMPs may be divided in 4 categories:
1.- Regular BMPs identify pathogenic microorganisms whether they are virus, bacteria, fungi or parasites.
2.- Special BMPs identify tissue alteration not supported by pathogenic microorganisms.
3.- Dysfunctional BMPs are the ones that affect glands and hormonal production.
4.- Reservoir BMPs identify organs or tissue which support potentially pathogenic virus and can keep them in reserve for an indefinite time, until some alteration in the body triggers it sending it to its specific location."

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense. The claims made by this website represent the worst sort of misleading promotion, putting together a series of unrelated scientific terms into something that may fool unsuspecting readers into thinking that the claims are valid.

To use this type of pseudo-medical rationale as a means of making money from people suffering from ill health strikes me as morally wrong.

The best counter-source of information I have found is the article
“Magnetic healing, quackery, and the debate about the health effects of electromagnetic fields”,
Annals of Internal Medicine, 118, 376-383 (1993).

I would like to see any claims made by the Cancun Wellness Centre for the beneficial effects of medical biomagnetism therapy formally investigated by the Mexican Medical Association or a related professional body, so that they can be exposed for the sham that they are."
------------------------------------------------------
[***/quote***]




I think there is nothing more to add. I hope that this article will find acceptance in the Chilean press and that it will serve as a wake-up call to the Chilean Medical Association, who apparently ignored our complaint. The next step will be to appeal to a member of parliament to regulate the practice of biomagnetism in Chile, as it is clearly a SCAM. CAE does not say so, the TRUE University of Oxford in England says so.

WE HAVE THE EXPERTS,
WE WIN.
POSTED BY CRISTIAN AT 12:20 AM/S 

TAGS: BIOMAGNETISM, BIOMAGNETISM MEDICAL, STUDIES BY ISAAC GOIZ DURÁN, MAGNETOTHERAPY, PSEUDOSCIENCE, ALTERNATIVE THERAPIES

595 COMMENTS:
[...]
[*/quote*]



THE ORIGINAL TEXT:

https://0cae0.blogspot.com/2008/08/la-verdadera-universidad-de-oxford-se.html

[*quote*]
CAE
CINICISMO, AGNOSTICISMO, ESCEPTICISMO.


JUEVES, 28 DE AGOSTO DE 2008

La verdadera Universidad de Oxford se pronuncia respecto al “biomagnetismo médico” de Isaac Goiz Durán.

Hace unos meses el autor de este blog en conjunto con Carlos Riquelme del blog Chile Liberal
http://chileliberal.blogspot.com/
denunció las actividades fraudulentas y pseudocientíficas de Isaac Goiz Durán al Colegio Médico de Chile
http://0cae0.blogspot.com/2008/04/advertencia-los-biomagnetistas-su-gur.html
usando como precedente la advertencia emitida por el Colegio de Médicos y Cirujanos de Costa Rica,
http://www.confemel.com/cartelera/amcr-070205.htm
institución que denunció a Goiz por fraude y ejercicio ilegal de la profesión de médico.

Después de 4 meses sin respuesta de parte del Colegio Médico de Chile (y una visita de Goiz a Chile y otra siendo planeada),
http://www.ohani.cl/curso_de_biomagnetismo.htm
decidí acudir a la verdadera Universidad de Oxford para que se pronunciara respecto a la “disciplina” del biomagnetismo médico.

Isaac Goiz (el “padre” de esta “disciplina”) ha sido presentado en incontables ocasiones en medios de comunicación como poseedor de un doctorado en “Medicina Bioenergética” o “Biomagnetismo Médico” de la “Universidad de Oxford” u “Oxford University”. Un ejemplo claro de esto se puede ver en el siguiente video obtenido desde el sitio de promoción del biomagnetismo chileno ohani.cl.


Sólo algunos sitios esclarecen que se trata de la “Oxford International University” que ya hemos explicado que nada tiene que ver con la verdadera Universidad de Oxford y que ha sido acusada de fraude académico en México.

En Julio pasado mandé un email a la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Oxford en Inglaterra haciéndoles saber que Isaac Goiz se presentaba en medios de prensa como poseedor de una calificación de doctorado de esa Universidad (o al menos prestándose a que se le asociara con esa Universidad) y solicitándoles que publicaran una refutación oficial de esta “terapia”. El oficial de prensa de la Facultad de Medicina el Sr. Jonathan Wood, respondió a mi petición y me envió la siguiente declaración OFICIAL de la VERDADERA Universidad de Oxford (las negritas son mías):

"Declaración de la Universidad de Oxford
Sr Isaac Goiz

La Universidad de Oxford no tiene registro de que el Sr Isaac Goiz o Isaac Goiz Durán haya recibido un Doctorado (PhD) o ningún otro grado por parte de la Universidad.

El Gobierno del Reino Unido ha proveído una lista de cuerpos e Instituciones de educación superior reconocidos con poderes para otorgar grados superiores en el sitio web del Departamento para la Innovación, Universidades y Habilidades en http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/. La Bircham International University y la Oxford International University no aparecen en esta lista

University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk 01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media  "


TEXTO ORIGINAL:

"Statement from the University of Oxford
Mr Isaac Goiz
The University of Oxford has no record of Mr Isaac Goiz or Mr Isaac Goiz Durán receiving a PhD or any other degree from the University.
The UK government has provided a list of recognised UK bodies and higher education institutions with degree-awarding powers on the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills website at http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/recognisedukdegrees/. Neither Bircham International University nor Oxford International University appear on this list."


Con esta declaración queda más que claro que el “Dr.” Isaac Goiz NO TIENE reconocimiento alguno por parte de una de las Universidades más importantes del mundo en el ámbito de la medicina y que además la “Oxford International University” no tiene autorización por parte del gobierno del Reino Unido para otorgar grados académicos.

Además el Profesor Quentin Sattentau de la Escuela de Patología

Sir William Dunn de la Universidad de Oxford, quien es un experto en el virus del SIDA, se tomó la molestia de escribir una pequeña refutación del biomagnetismo (muchos me han criticado por condenar la terapia sin ser médico), que deja bien clara la posición OFICIAL de la prestigiosa Universidad de Oxford respecto al Biomagnetismo Médico: ESTA PRÁCTICA NO ESTÁ BASADA EN CIENCIA O MEDICINA Y ES UNA COMPLETA TONTERÍA.

A continuación la refutación del Profesor Sattentau (las negritas son mías):

[***quote***]
------------------------------------------------------
"La mejor fuente de información que encontré sobre el biomagnetismo médico fue el sitio web del Cancun´s first Wellnes Center
http://groups.msn.com/CANCUNSFIRSTWELLNESSCENTER/biomagnetism.msnw_
. Este sitio web está basado en las afirmaciones de Isaac Goiz de que el biomagnetismo tiene un beneficio terapéutico. Junta citas sin referencias y trabajos no publicados, mezcla esto con algunos términos que suenan técnicos, y culmina con algo que no tiene base científica o médica.

Las siguientes afirmaciones son a mi parecer erradas o engañosas:

“En el siglo 20, el efecto e impacto de la terapia de campo magnético en más de 200.000 personas en más de 3000 estudios científicos han sido oficialmente publicados”

No puedo encontrar rastros en Medline, la base de datos internacional primaria para estudios biomédicos, de ninguna conexión entre “biomagnetismo” y “enfermedades infecciosas”. De hecho la búsqueda de los términos “biomagnetismo” y “enfermedad infecciosa” arrojó cero resultados. Sólo puedo concluir a partir de esto que no existen estudios llevados a cabo propiamente, revisados por pares publicados en esta materia. Todas las referencias a “biomagnetismo” en papers científicos en Medline están relacionadas con el uso del biomagnetismo como una herramienta de imagen, como en el caso de la Resonancia Nuclear Magnética.

2. “Esta particular aplicación de la terapia de campo magnético estpa basada en la tesis del Dr. Beren-Meyer, que fue un fisioterapista de astronautas, y quien en 1988 dio un seminario en Biomagnetismo, donde el fenómeno de pH orgánico energético fue expuesto”.

No puedo encontrar ninguna referencia a un Dr Beren-Meyer o su teoría. Los términos “fenómeno de pH energético orgánico” no tienen significado científico o médico.

3. El sitio web repetidamente mezcla “rastreo” y “diagnóstico” con “tratamiento”, sin ninguna justificación o explicación. No hay ninguna explicación de cómo se supone que funcionan el “diagnóstico” o “tratamiento”.

4. “El biomagnetismo médico define las cargas, las clasifica, organiza, neutraliza y cura. Los síntomas declinan”
Esta afirmación no tiene base alguna en medicina o ciencia y es una completa tontería.
5. “El método trabaja forzando las cargas hacia dentro del organismo para que las cargas se neutralicen entre ellas”
Esta afirmación no tiene base alguna en medicina o ciencia y es una completa tontería.
6. “En general, las enfermedades comunes son producidas por un solo Par Biomágnetico. Enfermedades infecciosas son el resultado de la asociación de 2 o más Pares Biomagnéticos.

Esta afirmación no tiene base alguna en medicina o ciencia y es una completa tontería.

7. “Investigaciones han mostrado que los pares biomagnéticos están divididos en 4 categorías:
1- Pares regulares identifican organismos patógenos ya sean virus, bacterias, hongos o parásitos”
2- Pares especiales identifican alteraciones en los tejidos no soportadas por organismo patogénicos
3-Pares disfuncionales son los que afectan glándulas y producción hormonal
4- Pares reservorio identifican órganos o tejidos que soportan virus potencialmente patógenos y pueden mantenerlos en reserva por un período indefinido de tiempo, hasta que una alteración en el cuerpo lo gatilla enviándola a su localización específica

Esta afirmación no tiene base alguna en medicina o ciencia y es una completa tontería.

Las afirmaciones hechas en este sitio web representan el peor tipo de promoción engañosa, convirtiendo una serie de términos científicos no relacionados en algo que podría llevar a lectores inocentes a pensar que las afirmaciones son válidas. El uso de este razonamiento pseudo-médico como una manera de hacer dinero a costa de personas sufriendo de mala salud me parece moralmente malo.

La mejor fuente de información alternativa que encontré es el artículo: “Magnetic healing, quackery, and the debate about the health effects of electromagnetic fields”, Annals of Internal Medicine, 118, 376-383 (1993).
http://www.annals.org/cgi/content/full/118/5/376

Me gustaría ver cualquier afirmación hecha por el Cancun Wellness Centre sobre los efectos beneficiosos del biomagnetismo investigada formalmente por la Asociación Médica de México o un cuerpo profesional relacionado, para que sean expuestos por la estafa que son.

University of Oxford Press Office
press.office@admin.ox.ac.uk
01865 280530
Oxford University news: www.ox.ac.uk/media
------------------------------------------------------
[***/quote***]


TEXTO ORIGINAL

[***quote***]
------------------------------------------------------
Professor Quentin Sattentau of the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford comments on claims for ‘medical biomagnetism’ as an alternative therapy technique:

“The best source of information I found on medical biomagnetism was the website Cancun’s first wellness center,

https://becks.mackmultiples.co.uk/exchweb/bin/redir.asp,DanaInfo=147.183.1.169+?URL=http://groups.msn.com/CANCUNSFIRSTWELLNESSCENTER/biomagnetism.msnw_

. This website is based on Isaac Goiz's claims that biomagnetism is of therapeutic benefit. It brings together unreferenced citations and unpublished work, mixes this with some technical sounding terms, and comes up with something with no scientific or medical basis.

The following statements seem to me to be factually wrong or misleading:

1. “In the 20th Century, the effect and impact of magnetic field therapy on over 200,000 people in more than 3,000 scientific studies have been officially published.”

I can find no trace on Medline, the primary international database for biomedical studies, of any link between 'biomagnetism' and ‘infectious diseases’. Indeed a search of the terms ‘biomagnetism’ and ‘infectious disease’ turns up no hits.

I can only conclude that there are no properly carried out, peer-reviewed, published studies on the subject. All reference in Medline's scientific papers to ‘biomagnetism’ refers to the use of magnetism as an imaging tool, as in NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance).

2. “This particular application of magnetic field therapy is based on Dr. Beren-Meyer’s thesis, who was a physiotherapist for astronauts, and who in 1988 gave a seminar on biomagnetics, where the organic pH energetic phenomena was exposed.”

I can find no reference to Dr. Beren-Meyer or his theory.

The terms "organic pH energetic phenomena" have no scientific or medical meaning.

3. The website text repeatedly mixes up ‘scanning’ and ‘diagnosis’ with ‘treatment’, with no justification or explanation.

There is no explanation of how the ‘diagnosis’ or ‘treatment’ is supposed to work.

4. “It [medicinal biomagnetism] defines the charges, classifies them, organizes, neutralizes and heals. Symptoms decline.”

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

5. "The method works forcing the charges toward the inside of the organism so the charges neutralize themselves on their own".

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

6. "In general, common diseases are produced by a single Bio-Magnetic Pair (BMP). Complex diseases are the result of association of two or more BMPs".

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense.

7. "The Research has shown that the BMPs may be divided in 4 categories:
1.- Regular BMPs identify pathogenic microorganisms whether they are virus, bacteria, fungi or parasites.
2.- Special BMPs identify tissue alteration not supported by pathogenic microorganisms.
3.- Dysfunctional BMPs are the ones that affect glands and hormonal production.
4.- Reservoir BMPs identify organs or tissue which support potentially pathogenic virus and can keep them in reserve for an indefinite time, until some alteration in the body triggers it sending it to its specific location."

This statement has no basis in science or medicine, and is complete nonsense. The claims made by this website represent the worst sort of misleading promotion, putting together a series of unrelated scientific terms into something that may fool unsuspecting readers into thinking that the claims are valid.

To use this type of pseudo-medical rationale as a means of making money from people suffering from ill health strikes me as morally wrong.

The best counter-source of information I have found is the article
“Magnetic healing, quackery, and the debate about the health effects of electromagnetic fields”,
Annals of Internal Medicine, 118, 376-383 (1993).

I would like to see any claims made by the Cancun Wellness Centre for the beneficial effects of medical biomagnetism therapy formally investigated by the Mexican Medical Association or a related professional body, so that they can be exposed for the sham that they are."
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Creo que no hay nada más que agregar. Espero que este artículo encuentre acogida en la prensa chilena y que sirva como un llamado de atención al Colegio Médico de Chile quien aparentemente se desentendió de nuestra denuncia. El siguiente paso será recurrir a algún parlamentario para que se regule la práctica del biomagnetismo en Chile, por ser claramente una ESTAFA. No lo dice CAE, lo dice la VERDADERA Universidad de Oxford en Inglaterra.

WE HAVE THE EXPERTS,
WE WIN.
PUBLICADAS POR CRISTIAN A LA/S 12:20 

ETIQUETAS: BIOMAGNETISMO, BIOMAGNETISMO MÉDICO, ESTUDIOS DE ISAAC GOIZ DURÁN, MAGNETOTERAPIA, PSEUDOCIENCIA, TERAPIAS ALTERNATIVAS

595 COMENTARIOS:
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