TG-1 * Transgallaxys Forum 1

Pages: [1]

Author Topic: Unverträglichkeit  (Read 2953 times)

ama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1110
Unverträglichkeit
« on: December 03, 2005, 01:44:57 PM »

[*QUOTE*]
From: <renate.ratlos@bigfoot.com> (Renate Ratlos )
Newsgroups: de.alt.naturheilkunde
Subject: Unverträglichkeit
Date: Fri, 09 May 2003 15:23:20 GMT
Organization: Universe 2
Message-ID: <3ee5c337.10144922@news1.ewetel.de>


http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11544.htm
[Zitatanfang]
@catherina- Rhesus Prophylaxe
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von DDr. Maurer am 08. Mai 2003 08:54:07:
Du bist an einen gewünschten Artikel nicht herangekommen.

Bitte sehr, damit sollten eigentlich alle Fragen geklärt sein. Erstaunlich
ist trotzdem die weitverbreitete emotionelle Ablehnung einer allgemein
durchgeführten sinnvollen Prophylaxe.

Immunology Letters
Volume 82, Issues 1-2 , 3 June 2002, Pages 67-73
doi:10.1016/S0165-2478(02)00020-2 Cite or link using doi
Copyright © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
On the mechanism of tolerance to the Rh D antigen mediated by passive
anti-D (Rh D prophylaxis)
Belinda M. Kumpel,
International Blood Group Reference Laboratory, Bristol Institute of
Transfusion Sciences, Southmead Road, Bristol BS10 5ND, UK
Available online 15 February 2002.
Abstract
Anti-D prophylaxis is the most successful clinical application of
antibody-mediated immune suppression. Passive IgG anti-D is given to Rh
D-negative women to prevent immunisation to foetal Rh D-positive red blood
cells (RBC) and subsequent haemolytic disease of the newborn. Despite its
widespread use and efficacy, the mechanism of action of this therapy is
unproven. The known facts about the antigen, antibody response, dose of
anti-D, RBC clearance and effects of the passive anti-D on subsequent
primary and secondary immune responses are discussed in relation to recent
information on ways by which immune responses may be suppressed. Most Rh D
antigen sites on RBC are not bound by passive anti-D, and thus epitope
masking (which may occur in experimental murine models using xenogeneic
RBC) is not the reason why anti-D responses are prevented by administration
of prophylactic anti-D. It is hypothesised that although clearance and
destruction of the antigenic RBC may be a contributing factor in preventing
immunisation, down-regulation of antigen-specific B cells through
co-ligation of B cell receptors and inhibitory IgG Fc receptors must also
occur.
Author Keywords: Anti-D; Rh D antigen; Haemolytic disease of the newborn;
Monoclonal antibodies; Antibody-mediated immune suppression; Red blood
cells; B cells; IgG Fc receptors Abbreviations: HDN, haemolytic disease of
the newborn; AMIS, antibody-mediated immune suppression; RBC, red blood
cells; SRBC, sheep red blood cells; BCR, B cell receptor; FcR,
IgG Fc receptor; FMH, foeto-maternal haemorrhage
Article Outline
1. Introduction
2. Experimental and clinical studies of monoclonal anti-D
3. Features of Rh D prophylaxis
3.1. D antigen
3.2. Anti-D
3.3. Ratio of antibody to antigen
3.4. Timing of passive anti-D
3.5. RBC clearance
3.6. Requirement for Fc
3.7. Cell and epitope specificity of suppression
3.8. Suppressive effect of passive anti-D
4. Mechanism of action of prophylactic anti-D
4.1. Clearance of RBC and destruction of antigen
4.2. Epitope masking
4.3. Inhibition of antigen-specific B cells by cross-linking BCR and FcRIIb
(co-inhibition)
4.4. Anti-idiotypic antibodies
4.5. Roles of cytokines, dendritic cells or T cells
5. Comparison of murine models of AMIS with Rh D prophylaxis
5.1. RBC for immunisation
5.2. Passive antibody and antibody-mediated immune suppression
6. Conclusions
References
1. Introduction
The Rh D antigen, a 30 kDa integral membrane polypeptide, is expressed
solely on human red blood cells (RBC) [1]. Approximately 16% of Caucasians
are D-negative, due to deletion of the gene, and thus transfusion of
D-positive (D+) blood into D-negative individuals is avoided.
However, D-negative women may become immunised by foetal D+ RBC that cross
the placenta.
The occurrence and volume of foeto-maternal haemorrhage (FMH) is greatest
at parturition [2].
The incidence of immunisation is about 16% of these incompatible
pregnancies [3].
The anti-D response develops slowly after D+ red cells have entered the
circulation, and is detectable serologically after 5–15 weeks. Normally the
response is restricted to IgG1 and IgG3 [4] as the antigen is a protein.
Since IgG is transported across the placenta during the second half of
pregnancy (to confer passive immunity to the foetus), the anti-D will bind
to foetal RBC resulting in their removal from the circulation by splenic
macrophages expressing IgG Fc receptor (FcR) [5].
Haemolysis of the RBC will then occur, leading to the clinical syndromes
known collectively as haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn (HDN)
(reviewed in Ref. [6]).
Fifty years ago 10% of neonatal deaths were due to HDN [7]. With the
recognition of the pathogenesis of the disease the death rate then fell
tenfold mainly due to early delivery and also to improved obstetric and
neonatal care. However, until 30 years ago the occurrence and treatment of
infants affected by HDN was a considerable burden on hospital care, and the
disease was especially tragic for some families with recurrent cases.
In the 1960s clinicians working in England and the USA realised that it
might be possible to prevent immunisation with passive IgG anti-D. The
rationales for their experiments were different. In Liverpool, anti-D was
given in order to clear the D-positive RBC, as it had been observed that
the incidence of D-immunisation was lower in ABO incompatible pregnancies
than in compatible pregnancies [8 and 9]. Foetal RBC would be destroyed by
maternal anti-A or anti-B by complement-mediated intravascular haemolysis
and sequestration of the stroma in the liver, an organ that has little
antibody-forming ability. Experiments in New York and New Jersey [10] were
based on very early observations of the ability of passive antisera to
suppress antibody responses to ox
RBC injected into rabbits [11] and to diphtheria toxin in guinea pigs [12].
After many experiments and clinical trials in several countries, anti-D
purified from high-titre pooled human plasma was licensed for use in the
late 1960s.
Anti-D prophylaxis is now a widespread and remarkably successful therapy,
perhaps the only clinical use of antibody-mediated immune suppression
(AMIS). Ten percent of all women receive passive anti-D post-partum, those
who are D-negative with a D+ infant. The death rate has dropped markedly,
from 18.4 to 1.3 per 100000 live births [13], and it is now a rare disease.
Although the incidence of immunisation has also greatly reduced, by about
90%, some cases of HDN still occur due mainly to immunisation resulting
from FMH during pregnancy. It would be desirable to prevent this by giving
anti-D antenatally, at 28 and 34 weeks, but there is insufficient anti-D.
Paradoxically, the shortage is due in large part to the remarkable success
of the Rh D prophylaxis program, as very few women are now immunised and
able to donate plasma.
Deliberate immunisation of men is used to make up the shortfall. Provision
of clinical grade anti-D is expensive and most European countries now rely
on North American sources.
Monoclonal anti-D antibodies have been produced in several laboratories
(reviewed in Ref. [14]).
All these monoclonal antibodies are human, as mice do not recognise the D
antigen. They have been prepared from human B cells from hyper-immunised
donors, usually immortalised with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and then in some
laboratories these cells fused with mouse myeloma cells to maintain
stability of growth of the cell lines.
2. Experimental and clinical studies of monoclonal anti-D Several
monoclonal anti-D's produced from EBV-transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell
lines by the author (without fusion with myeloma cells) have been
characterised in vitro for their serological, immunochemical and
immunological (functional) activity [15]. Based on these properties and
also on the high growth rates and stability of antibody secretion of their
cell lines, two monoclonal antibodies, BRAD-3 (IgG3) and BRAD-5 (IgG1),
were then selected and tested in vivo using human subjects.
Both BRAD-3 and BRAD-5 have high affinity for the D antigen, are not
cross-reactive, express Gm allotypes frequently encountered in Caucasians
(G3m(21) and G1m(3), respectively) and have kappa light chains. Their
glycosylation is similar to that of human serum IgG, although with a
slightly higher content of galactose and bisecting N-acetyl glucosamine
residues [16].
Using monocytes as effector cells in in vitro assays of RBC phagocytosis
and extracellular lysis, BRAD-3 and other IgG3 anti-D mediated greater
activity than IgG1 monoclonal anti-D's [17].
Effector function was mediated solely through FcRI [18], although FcRIIa
and low levels of FcRIIIa are expressed on monocytes. However, using
natural killer (NK) cells (FcRIIIa+) as effector cells in
antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays, only a
minority of IgG1 monoclonal anti-D's (including BRAD-5) demonstrated the
ability to mediate haemolysis.
There was no relationship between haemolytic activity and Gm allotype or D
epitope specificity of the anti-D [19 and 20]. Unusually, BRAD-5 exhibited
comparable activity to polyclonal anti-D.
Using eight monoclonal anti-D's, there was some correlation (r=0.69)
between the extent of extracellular haemolysis by NK cells in ADCC assays
and the binding of RBC coated with anti-D to macrophages in spleen cryostat
sections [21]. FcRIIIa was utilised in both assays. All these in vitro
assays were used to predict the likely ability of monoclonal anti-D to
mediate RBC clearance by human splenic macrophages.
In contrast, interactions of anti-D-coated RBC with B cells were difficult
to quantify in vitro. Levels of opsonization higher than would be achieved
physiologically were required. IgG3 was shown to be more effective at
promoting adherence than IgG1 [22].
Next, the pharmacokinetics of BRAD-3 and BRAD-5 were studied by i.m.
injection into D-negative subjects and anti-D activity in plasma determined
by haemagglutination in samples taken up to 42 days later. The half-lives
were similar to or greater than those of 125I-labelled myeloma proteins,
and were 10.2 days (BRAD-3, IgG3) and 22.2 days (BRAD-5, IgG1) [23].
Interaction with FcRn and subsequent protection from lysosomal catabolism
is thought to be the mechanism whereby plasma levels of IgG are maintained
at relatively high levels [24]. Iodination of IgG may compromise this
activity.
The clearance of 51Cr-labelled D+ RBC injected i.v. into 27 D-negative male
subjects was accelerated by BRAD-3, BRAD-5 or polyclonal anti-D, injected
i.m. 2 days earlier. The mean half-lives of the RBC were 12.7, 5.9 and 5.0
h, respectively [25], compared to that of unsensitised RBC of 31 days.
Thus, in vivo, it was likely that the anti-D-coated RBC interacted with
both FcRI and FcRIIIa on splenic macrophages and that this contributed to
the rapid removal of RBC from the circulation. Earlier, it had been found
that a monoclonal IgG1 anti-D that was not haemolytic in NK ADCC assays
[19] did not mediate accelerated RBC clearance [26], demonstrating the
requirement for FcRIIIa interaction in vivo.
The 27 subjects were then tested for the serological production of anti-D
every 2 weeks for 6 months. There was no evidence of immunisation, although
21% subsequently developed anti-D after second or third injections of D+
RBC given at 6 and 9 months without passive anti-D. The kinetics
(anti-D detected 10–14 weeks and 2–4 weeks later, respectively) indicated
primary responses.
Thus, the passive monoclonal anti-D had protected these subjects from
D-immunisation [25], an important observation.
A similar but much larger multi-centre study then demonstrated the efficacy
of 400 g of a 1:3 blend of BRAD-3:BRAD-5 at preventing immunisation in 95
D-negative male subjects given 5 ml D+ RBC 1 day earlier. Although there
was one failure of prophylaxis, this was much lower than expected
considering the relatively large dose of RBC (compared to most FMH) and the
dose of anti-D [27].
In both studies it was observed that the percentages of responders (21 and
24% after two challenge injections of D+ RBC given 6 and 9 months after the
first) was about half that expected if no passive anti-D had been given.
This reflects earlier data, when 31 [28], 37 [29] and 33% [30] of subjects
responded after they had previously had passive anti-D and D+ RBC.
The levels of anti-D in the plasma of responders were also lower. It was
earlier noted that the severity of HDN (which is due mainly to anti-D
concentration) was less in patients previously given prophylactic anti-D
than in unprotected controls [31].
3. Features of Rh D prophylaxis
3.1. D antigen
The Rh D polypeptide is a 30 kDa integral membrane polypeptide with 12
membrane-spanning regions and six extracellular loops that lie close to the
lipid bilayer. These contain the D epitopes [1].
Heterozygote RBC express 10000–20000 copies per cell [32].
3.2. Anti-D
The percentage of D-negative individuals responding to immunisation with D+
RBC depends on the dose, with as little as 0.5 ml RBC stimulating an anti-D
response in some subjects, reaching a maximum of 80% responders to one unit
(450 ml) of blood. The antibody response is slow to develop, usually
detectable serologically 5–15 weeks after immunisation. It is weak at
first, sometimes IgM is produced, but conversion to IgG normally follows
rapidly. IgG anti-D is non-agglutinating and does not bind complement, and
has association constants of approximately 3×108 (polyclonal anti-D) [33]
or 3×109 l mol-1 (monoclonal anti-D) [25 and 34]. The immune response is
likely to be T cell-dependent, since the D polypeptide antigen is expressed
at relatively low density on the RBC (compared to T-independent
oligosaccharide antigens) and stimulates high^affinity IgG1 and IgG3
anti-D.
3.3. Ratio of antibody to antigen
A dose of 100 g (500 iu) anti-D is sufficient to prevent an antibody
response to 5 ml RBC [35].
Although this is theoretically a 1:1 ratio of antibody:antigen, not all the
anti-D is taken up from the intramuscular site of injection into the
plasma, and it can be calculated from the law of mass action that no more
than 20% of the IgG will be bound to the cells and 8% of the antigen sites
will be occupied [36]. At higher concentrations of IgG and D+ RBC (but at
the same ratio), more antibodies will be bound and more antigen sites will
be blocked, but even at very high doses––20
mg anti-D and 1000 ml RBC––only 40% of the D antigens will be bound by
anti-D. In a recent study, the amount of monoclonal anti-D on RBC ex vivo
was measured empirically, using flow cytometry, and found to have bound to
an average of 20% of the D antigen sites [37]. Saturation of the D antigen
with passive anti-D never occurs [33].
For prevention of the anti-D response, the ratio of antibody to antigen
varies with the volume of RBC. A dose of 5 g was insufficient for 0.5 ml
RBC [38], but the same ratio (10 g ml-1 RBC) was effective at preventing
immunisation to 50 ml or more RBC [39]. It can be calculated that a
minimum density of 200–400 molecules of passive IgG anti-D per RBC is
required for protection against immunisation.
3.4. Timing of passive anti-D
Anti-D may be administered 12 weeks before parturition, provided a
sufficient dose is maintained in the plasma to ensure that binding to
foetal RBC is not below the critical density. It is recommended that
prophylactic anti-D is given within 72 h of delivery. Passive anti-D was
not suppressive when given 13 days after D-positive RBC [40].
3.5. RBC clearance
RBC coated with IgG anti-D are cleared to the spleen [41], with the rate of
clearance being related to the amount of IgG on the RBC [42]. For effective
suppression, small volumes of transfused cells (less than 1 ml) must be
completely cleared within 5 days [39], but RBC in FMH over 10–20 ml need
not all be removed from the circulation at this time [43].
3.6. Requirement for Fc
RBC coated with F(ab')2 fragments of IgG anti-D were not cleared from the
circulation [44], and so presumably would not be effective for prophylaxis,
as discussed above. IgM anti-D did not mediate suppression [45]. The data
indicates that IgG is required.
3.7. Cell and epitope specificity of suppression
Passive IgG anti-K suppressed the anti-D response of K-negative, D-negative
subjects to K+D+ RBC, suggesting that this was particle (cell) specific
[46]. In contrast, IgG anti-A did not prevent immunisation to A+D+ RBC,
although the amount of anti-A on the pre-coated RBC may have been low [47].
The topography of the membrane-proximal D [48] and K [49] antigens may be
important. The oligosaccharide blood group A antigens are on
membrane-distal glycoproteins. In the recent clinical study [27], the
anti-D produced by the subject who was not protected from immunisation by
the monoclonal anti-D was of a similar D epitope specificity as the
monoclonal anti-D, but from this single case it is not possible to
determine the epitope specificity of suppression.
3.8. Suppressive effect of passive anti-D
Suppression of the anti-D response is qualitative, i.e. an all-or-none
effect. There appears to be a long-lasting inhibition, as there were a
reduced number of responders many months after the passive anti-D was given
(just before or after the D+ RBC), as detailed above [25, 27, 28, 29 and
30].
Furthermore, anti-D levels in the responders were reduced. If passive
anti-D was given after initiation of primary responses, D immunisation
could not be reversed, and there was no suppression of a secondary response
[50].

ama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1110
Unverträglichkeit
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2005, 01:45:25 PM »

4. Mechanism of action of prophylactic anti-D
There are several theoretical ways whereby protection against D
immunisation could be conferred by passive anti-D, and these are discussed
in the context of current knowledge of immunology and Rh D prophylaxis.
4.1. Clearance of RBC and destruction of antigen
Small volumes of IgG-anti-D coated RBC are rapidly removed to the spleen
where they undergo phagocytosis or extracellular lysis by macrophages. This
is the mechanism for removal of senescent RBC by endogenous `natural'
antibodies [51]. Resting macrophages (`garbage collectors') express few HLA
class II molecules and are poor antigen-presenting cells (APC's). Thus
macrophage destruction of alloantigens might preclude the efficient
presentation of foreign D peptides. However, in the absence of passive
anti-D, D+ RBC are eventually immunogenic when enough senescent RBC have
been cleared to the spleen, and thus macrophage presentation of D peptides
must be sufficient to initiate an anti-D response. In addition, the fact
that anti-D prophylaxis is successful with large volumes of D+ RBC even
though not all the RBC are rapidly cleared, suggests that clearance alone
may not be the sole mode of action of passive anti-D.
4.2. Epitope masking
Blocking of all the D epitopes or D antigens with passive anti-D does not
occur, as shown above (Section 3.3). Most of the D antigen sites are not
bound by IgG, and could react with the B cell receptors (BCR, surface IgM)
of antigen-specific B cells. In addition, anti-K cannot mask the D
antigens, although it prevented anti-D responses. Therefore, although
masking of epitopes may well occur in animal models (see further
discussion), it cannot operate in Rh D prophylaxis.
4.3. Inhibition of antigen-specific B cells by cross-linking BCR and FcRIIb
(co-inhibition) Aggregation of BCR by multivalent antigen leads to
activation of the B cell and then proliferation and secretion of antibody.
The initial cellular events occur by phosphorylation of tyrosine residues
within immuno-receptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM) [52] in the
cytoplasmic portions of BCR-associated subunits (Ig, Ig), and the
phosphorylated ITAMs then bind to SH2 domain-bearing protein tyrosine
kinases (PTK) [53 and 54]. FcRIIb on B cells has, uniquely for an FcR, a
corresponding ITIM [55]. B cell activation may be prevented by addition of
anti- or immune complexes, when the BCR and FcRIIb are co-ligated
simultaneously (reviewed in Ref. [56]). Co-crosslinking of the BCR and
FcRIIb leads to phosphorylation of a tyrosine in the ITIM by the PTK now
bound to the phosphorylated ITAM. This results in recruitment of SH2
containing phosphatases to the co-clustered receptors and localisation near
the membrane (reviewed in Ref. [57]). The contribution of the phosphatases
identified as SHP-1 and SHP-2 (tyrosine phosphatases) and SHIP and SHIP-2
(inositol 5-phosphatases) may vary. Human B cells preferentially utilise
SHP-2 [58], and while resting murine B cells express only SHIP, after
activation the inhibitory signal is mediated by SHIP-2 [59]. The effect of
co-aggregation of BCR and FcRIIb is inhibition of Ca2+ influx and down
regulation of B cell activation, proliferation and antibody production,
resulting eventually in apoptosis of the B cell [60]. The BCR localises to
lipid rafts on activation, and if FcRIIb is co-ligated it is also recruited
into these membrane microdomains, suggesting that both positive and
negative signalling require these receptors and the accessory molecules to
be in the rafts [61]. The degree of down regulation (inhibition of Ca2+
mobilisation) depends on the ratio of BCR-BCR to BCR-FcRIIb cross-linking,
and is most effective with suboptimal BCR activation [62]. It may be less
efficient with B cells expressing higher affinity antibody, later in an
immune response. Immature B cells are more sensitive to BCR-FcRIIb induced
inhibition of the rise in intracellular [Ca2+] than mature B cells [63].
The facts of anti-D-mediated immune suppression are consistent with the
notion of inhibition of immature antigen-specific B cells by RBC that have
vacant antigens and also antigen-bound IgG, i.e. immune complexes. Multiple
co-aggregation of BCR and FcRIIb is likely to occur. The dose of
passive anti-D must be sufficient to ensure at least 200 IgG molecules are
bound to the RBC, perhaps so that enough FcRIIb are engaged to override the
BCR-mediated activatory signals. The Fc of IgG anti-D appears to be
required for suppression. Although the D polypeptide antigen is in
excess compared to FcRIIb-bound IgG, the BCR may not bind the D antigen
efficiently because it is relatively inaccessible, close to the lipid
bilayer. However, once engaged, the simultaneous binding
of BCR to the D antigen and FcRIIb to cell-bound anti-D, may bring the
membranes of the two cells in close apposition, enhancing further contacts
and eliminating larger molecules. The anti-D must be given before senescent
D+ RBC are cleared to the spleen and induce an immune response––there is no
inhibition of an established primary response by passive anti-D––indicating
only immature antigen-specific B cells may be down regulated. If the
splenic clearance mechanism is saturated by a large volume of D+ RBC coated
with passive anti-D, all antigen-specific B cells will be inhibited and
therefore the residual D+ RBC in the circulation will not be antigenic, as
observed in practice. The interesting finding that passive anti-K may
substitute for anti-D in preventing an anti-D response to D+K+ RBC is
compatible with the theory that passive anti-D (or anti-K) enables
co-aggregation of multiple BCR and FcRIIb on immature anti-D-specific B
cells.
4.4. Anti-idiotypic antibodies
Anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) can inhibit B cells by binding both to
the BCR and FcRIIb [64].
However, anti-Id are not present in monoclonal anti-D and were not detected
following administration of monoclonal or polyclonal anti-D [25], and thus
it is unlikely that they have a role in anti-D prophylaxis.
4.5. Roles of cytokines, dendritic cells or T cells
The observation that there appears to be long lasting inhibition of primary
anti-D responses is difficult to explain solely on the basis of inhibition
of B cells or of clearance and destruction of RBC.
Transforming growth factor (TGF) may bind to IgG in the immune complexes on
the cells and enhance B cell inhibition [65] and apoptosis [66]. TGF or the
presence of passive IgG on RBC may induce regulatory or anergic subsets of
T cells [67], secreting cytokines such as IL-10 or TGF . In turn,
modulation of immature dendritic cells or macrophages by these cytokines
might reduce their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cell responses, inducing a
form of tolerance [68 and 69].
5. Comparison of murine models of AMIS with Rh D
prophylaxis Recently, Rh D prophylaxis and AMIS in mice and rabbits was
reviewed [70]. It concluded that inhibition of alloantibody responses to
rabbit RBC by passive IgG was more similar to Rh D prophylaxis than AMIS in
mice. Here, the main features of the immunising antigens, antibody
responses and passive antibodies in mice and (wo)men are summarised in
Table 1 and discussed below.
Table 1. Comparison of the characteristics of antigens, antibody responses
and passive antibodies in murine AMIS and human Rh D prophylaxis (27K)
5.1. RBC for immunisation
Mice have no known blood groups, and so xenogeneic RBC (usually sheep RBC
(SRBC)) have been used as a source of cellular antigens. These generate
rapid (3 day) IgM complement-fixing anti-RBC antibodies, that later convert
to IgG. The antigens are mainly oligosaccharide epitopes, located distal
from the cell membrane and with high epitope densities, similar to human
ABO blood groups. All mice will make antibody responses. SRBC are cleared
very rapidly to the liver and spleen, even in the absence of antibody [71],
probably through binding to complement and lectin-like (mannose) receptors,
thus utilising components of the innate immune system. If the foreign RBC
are cleared to the liver, rather than the spleen, `suppression' of antibody
responses may be observed since the liver is not an organ of antibody
formation but rather is a non-inflammatory
disposal site.
5.2. Passive antibody and antibody-mediated immune suppression
The read-out in murine models is normally 4–6 day plaque-forming responses
(PFC) of splenocytes. IgG anti-SRBC generally suppress the response to
SRBC, but experimental variables (antibody affinity, timing of antigen and
antibody, dose of antigen) affect the outcome [72].
Suppression was found more effective with small doses of SRBC (4×105 cells)
than large doses (4×107 cells) [73]. A high dose of passive antibody
relative to the number of SRBC is required, approximately 1000 times more
than for passive anti-D prophylaxis in humans. The degree of suppression
(percentage of control PFC) is dependent on the dose of passive IgG, and
may reach 99% if all epitopes on RBC are blocked [74]. IgE and F(ab')2
fragments of antibodies reactive with RBC can also suppress, although less
efficiently than whole IgG, and thus the Fc of IgG does not appear to be
essential [73]. Indeed, SRBC coated with methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG)
did not stimulate antibody responses in mice [75], demonstrating this form
of immune suppression may be achieved chemically as well as with
antibodies. AMIS occurred in mice deficient in FcRIIb and/or activatory FcR
[74]. In FcRIIb-negative mice co-ligation of BCR and FcRIIb cannot occur,
and in FcR -chain-deficient mice that lack FcRI and FcRIII clearance of
SRBC may be diverted to the liver where destruction of the antigens may
follow. The role of complement has not been well documented. Epitope
masking was the mechanism proposed for AMIS in mice given SRBC [74].
6. Conclusions
The clinical and experimental data indicates that passive IgG anti-D
prevents antibody responses to D+ RBC by a Fc-dependent mechanism, most
likely involving down-regulation of specific antibody-forming B cells
through co-aggregation of BCR and FcRIIb. Clearance and destruction of
opsonised RBC may also be important, especially at low doses of RBC. There
is insufficient passive anti-D to block the majority of the D antigen
sites. The mechanism of action of prophylactic anti-D is in marked contrast
to that of AMIS in experimental models whereby mice are protected from
immunisation with SRBC by passive antibody preparations, when epitope
masking is the most likely explanation. Suppression of antibody responses
to high-density xenogeneic RBC antigens in mice and to low density protein
RBC alloantigens in humans operates in fundamentally dissimilar ways.


Antworten:
Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde! Angelika Kögel-Schauz 08.5.2003 22:55
(1)
Re: Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde! DDr. Maurer 09.5.2003 09:05 (0)
cool, danke =0) Catherina 08.5.2003 10:53 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11557.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde!
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 08. Mai 2003 22:55:17:
Als Antwort auf: @catherina- Rhesus Prophylaxe geschrieben von DDr. Maurer
am 08. Mai 2003 08:54:07:
Hallo Herr Dr. Maurer,
ich finde aber in dem von Ihnen dankenswerterweise einkopierten Artikel
leider nichts Wesentliches zu dem von mir angesprochenen Thema, warum die
gespritzten Antikörper nicht schaden, die von der Mutter gebildeten aber
schon.
Der Artikel ist für Laien wirklich kaum verständlich. Ich habe am Ende des
2. Kapitels nur einen kurzen Abschnitt gefunden, dass es wohl ein Studie
gab, in der der Zustand der Babys untersucht wurde, deren Mütter Antikörper
prophylaktisch oder nicht erhalten hatten. Der Zustand der Babys von
Müttern, die die Spritze prophylaktisch erhalten hatten, war besser.
Leider fehlen aber bei dem Artikel die Quellenangaben, so dass ich die
zitierte Quelle nicht finden konnte. Können Sie diese Quellenangaben bitte
noch nachliefern?
Gibt es noch mehr Stellen, die für das von mir angesprochene Thema wichtig
sind?
Vielen Dank und Grüße
Angelika Kögel-Schauz

Antworten:
Re: Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde! DDr. Maurer 09.5.2003 09:05 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]



http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11560.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Re: Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde!
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von DDr. Maurer am 09. Mai 2003 09:05:14:
Als Antwort auf: Brauche Hilfe, weil ich nichts finde! geschrieben von
Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 08. Mai 2003 22:55:17:
>Hallo Herr Dr. Maurer,
>ich finde aber in dem von Ihnen dankenswerterweise einkopierten Artikel leider nichts Wesentliches zu dem von mir angesprochenen Thema, warum die gespritzten Antikörper nicht schaden, die von der Mutter gebildeten aber schon.
>Der Artikel ist für Laien wirklich kaum verständlich.
Wissenschaftliche Artikel sind auch nicht für Laien geschrieben- die Welt
ist halt arbeitsteilig-ist ja auch gut so. Es gibt ja hier das merkwürdige
Verlangen immer wieder wissenschaftliche Artikel im Original zu haben- um
sie auf Plausibilität zu prüfen. Dazu brauchts aber Grundlagen.
Ich habe am Ende des 2. Kapitels nur einen kurzen Abschnitt gefunden, dass
es wohl ein Studie gab, in der der Zustand der Babys untersucht wurde,
deren Mütter Antikörper prophylaktisch oder nicht erhalten hatten. Der
Zustand der Babys von Müttern, die die Spritze prophylaktisch erhalten
hatten, war besser.
Was heisst besser- die haben überlebt- deswegen macht man das ja.
>Leider fehlen aber bei dem Artikel die Quellenangaben, so dass ich die zitierte Quelle nicht finden konnte. Können Sie diese Quellenangaben bitte noch nachliefern?
Offensichtlich kann man hier nur eine begrenzte Menge hineinkopieren- das
hat der Server wohl nicht alles schlucken können.

Antworten:
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

Unverträglichkeit.

Da:

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11566.htm
[Zitatanfang]
@DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 09. Mai 2003 11:07:08:
Hallo Herr Dr. Maurer,
ich hatte Sie nicht nach diesem Fachartikel gefragt. Sie haben ihn ins
Forum gestellt, statt mir meine einfache Frage, wieso die gespritzten
Antikörper dem Ungeborenen nicht schaden, die von der Mutter gebildeten
aber schon, zu beantworten.
Ich habe mir die große Mühe gemacht als Laie Ihren Artikel zu lesen und die
weitere Frage an Sie gestellt, ob die eine Stelle, die ich zu meiner Frage
gefunden habe, die einzige in diesem Artikel ist.
Auch diese Frage haben Sie mir genauswenig beantwortet, wie meine Bitte den
Rest des Artikels mit den Quellenangaben nachzuliefern erfüllt.
Ich stelle fest:
Laut Fachinformation Rhesogam können nach der Geburt im Baby die der Mutter
in der Schwangerschaft gespritzten Antikörper nachgewiesen werden.
Es gibt keine nachvollziehbaren und belegten Aussagen, warum das nicht
schaden soll.
Sowohl Catherina als auch Sie können meine Frage beantworten.
Herr Dr. Maurer, sprechen Sie Eltern allen Ernstes das Recht ab, auch für
Laien verständliche Auskünfte über eine medizinische Behandlung zu
erhalten?
Grüße
Angelika Kögel-Schauz
Für Strogi: du hattest mal gefragt, welche Funktion DDr. Maurer inne hat.
Schau doch mal unter
http://www.akh-wien.ac.at/kikli

Antworten:
Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit Catherina 09.5.2003
11:12 (1)
Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit DDr. Maurer
09.5.2003 11:38 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11567.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von Catherina am 09. Mai 2003 11:12:53:
Als Antwort auf: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit
geschrieben von Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 09. Mai 2003 11:07:08:
Angelika,
ich habe diese Frage bereits (mit Rechnung) beantwortet. Es ist eine Frage
der Konzentration an anti-D Antikörpern. In der schwedischen Dissertation
(link habe ich beigefügt) wird genau erklärt, wie man auf so einen Aussage
kommen kann. Ich verstehe nicht, was Dir noch an Info fehlt und muss mich
doch dagegen verwahren, dass Du behauptest, Deine Frage sei nicht
beantwortet worden. Alle Informationen sind auf dem Tisch.
Catherina

Antworten:
Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit DDr. Maurer
09.5.2003 11:38 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11568.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von DDr. Maurer am 09. Mai 2003 11:38:09:
Als Antwort auf: Re: @DDr. Maurer wegen IDP bei Rhesusunverträglichkeit
geschrieben von Catherina am 09. Mai 2003 11:12:53:
>Angelika,
>ich habe diese Frage bereits (mit Rechnung) beantwortet. Es ist eine Frage der Konzentration an anti-D Antikörpern. In der schwedischen Dissertation (link habe ich beigefügt) wird genau erklärt, wie man auf so einen Aussage kommen kann. Ich verstehe nicht, was Dir noch an Info fehlt und muss mich doch dagegen verwahren, dass Du behauptest, Deine Frage sei nicht beantwortet worden. Alle Informationen sind auf dem Tisch.
>Catherina
So ist es. Und wenn durch die Therapie weniger Kinder sterben und weniger
schwere Schäden durch Rhesusunverträglichkeit haben, ist doch klar, dass
der Nutzen bei weitem das Risiko überwiegt.
Und wenn AKS mit dem Fachreview, den ich hier reingestellt habe nichts
anfangen kann, braucht sie die anderen Literaturzitate ja auch nicht.
Ich halte sehr viel von Elternaufklärung bzw Patientenaufklärung, aber ich
kann auch nicht verhindern, dass es einige nicht verstehen, trotz
beiderseitigen Bemühen. Nichts ist 100% in der Medizin.

Antworten:

[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

Zusammenfassung:

http://f23.parsimony.net/forum49144/messages/43395.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Maurer im Mitmach-Kaspertheater
DAS Forum f. Medizin, Heilkunde und Medizinkritik
Geschrieben von Meinung am 09. Mai 2003 09:55:29:

Kasper: "Maurer, Maurer, Du kannst uns ja viel erzählen.
        Benenne mir öffentlich einen Artikel
        in dem die Existenz von Erreger X/ Wirksamkeit von Impfung Y
        belegt wird. Sonst ist das alles gelogen."
Maurer: "Hier hast Du gleich 20 Artikel".
Kasper: "Maurer, Maurer. Ich will aber nur EINEN Artikel benannt haben".
Maurer: "Dann nimm doch Artikel Z"
Kasper: "Maurer, Maurer. Wo bekomme ich denn den Artikel Z her?"
Maurer: "Geh in eine Bibliothek oder bestell bei Subito".
Kasper: "Öhh. Ich weiß doch gar nicht, wie eine Bibliothek aussieht.
        Maurer, Maurer, kannst Du mir den Artikel nicht schicken?"
Maurer: "O.K. Hier der Artikel"
Kasper: "Maurer, Maurer, der ist ja in ENGLISCH."
Maurer: "Probier doch mal http://www.leo.org"
Kasper: "Maurer, Maurer, in dem Artikel sind ja so viele Fachbegriffe.
        Da verstehe ich ja gar nichts davon."
Maurer: "Na, ich hab's ja ganz am Anfang laienverständlich erklärt. Also
        nochmal ..."

GOTO 1

Etwaige Ähnlichkeiten mit lebenden Personen sind rein zufällig

[Zitatende]

Wer ist Angelika Kögel-Schauz?

Die da:

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11462.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Grundsätzliche Überlegungen
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 06. Mai 2003 08:32:21:
Hallo alle,
die heftigen aber doch fruchtlosen Diskussionen von gestern zeigen wieder
mal ganz gut den Knackpunkt:
Diejenigen, die an Impfungen (inkl. nicht vorhandenen Beweisen für die
krankmachende und ursächliche Wirkung von Viren) festhalten, müssen bie
sich bei so viel Aufgeklärtheit und kritischer Fragerei des gemeinen (nicht
mal studierten!) Volkes an jeden Strohhalm klammern.
Konkrete Antworten und Fakten kommen da nicht! Gibts halt nicht.
Ich beschäftige mich seit einigen Wochen intensiver mit diesen sog.
Virennachweisen und Testverfahren. Ich bin genauso erschüttert, wie ich es
damals war, als ich mich mit der Herstellung von Impfstoffen beschäftigt
habe, wie sehr diese Verfahren im Labor einer mittelalterlichen Hexenküche
ähneln! Die Herstellung von pflanzlichen oder homöopathischen Arzneimitteln
ist eine völlig saubere nachvollziehbare Geschichte.
Das Internet trägt einen wesentlichen Bestandteil, dass auch nicht
Wissenschaftler an genug Material kommen, um -wenn auch mit großer Mühe- zu
recherchieren. Und auf einmal sind da so viele unbequeme Fragen!
Es hat doch bisher seit Jahrhunderten die Geheimhaltung der Götter in Weiß
supergut funktioniert.
Wie sehr der sog. Schulmedizin oder Schulwissenschaft das Wasser bis zum
Hals steht, sieht man an den letzten Beiträgen im Forum.
Es ist eben einfach überhaupt nicht so, dass bei einem Windpocken Ausbruch
(Epidemie ist das keine!) in einem Kindergarten alle nicht dagegen
geimpften Kinder erkranken! Vielmehr erkrankt nur ein Teil, und vor allem
auch Geimpfte! Beim nächsten Ausbruch ergreifen wiederum einige Kinder, die
Chance Windpocken zu bekommen. Wie gibt es denn das, liebe
Schulwissenschaftler? Warum brauchen manche Kinder mehrere Anläufe, um sich
die Windpocken zu holen?
Wenn ich nicht aktzeptieren kann, dass alles im Leben einen Sinn macht
(steht übrigens in allen weisen Büchern der Welt, Bibel, Koran, ...), dann
ist mir der Blick verstellt. Jetzt höre ich schon die Radikalen aus dem
Hassforum von nebenan sich geifern und giften, dass ich dafür bin, dass die
armen kleinen Kinder an Windpocken und Masern leiden und sterben. Weit
gefehlt! Meine feste Überzeugung, die sich mit meiner Lebenserfahrung und
Beobachtung zu 100% deckt, ist die: jede Krankheit, auch eine sog.
Infektion oder Krebs macht Sinn und es steckt eine wichtige Botschaft
dahinter. Wir müssen unseren Kindern helfen, diese Botschaften möglichst
frühzeitig zu erkennen, aufzulösen und die Selbstheilungskräfte anzuregen.
Ich bin übrigens katholisch und dort auch engagiert, falls jetzt wieder
dieser blöde Sektenvorwurf kommt, weil man sonst keine Argumente mehr hat.
Viren sind nicht die Ursache der Infektionskrankheiten, allensfalls
Informationsträger, die bei einer entsprechenden Disposition die
Selbstheilungskräfte ankurbeln. Natürlich kann diese Heilreaktion sehr (zu)
heftig ausfallen. Nach meinen Beobachtungen und vielen Gesprächen mit
Ärzten und Heilpraktikern ist da im Vorfeld schon sehr viel falsch gemacht
worden (z.B. Unterdrückung des äußerst heilsamen Fiebers). Trotzdem ist es
für eine Umkehr nie zu spät! Möglichst natürliche Lebensweise (Ernährung,
seelische Gesundheit, ...) und Naturheilverfahren, Homöopathie, etc. können
bei dieser Umkehr sehr hilfreich sein. Später braucht man sie kaum noch!
Der Mensch besteht aus Erregern, geschichtlich aus Bakterien. Wir sind mit
den sog. Viren und Bakterien eng verwandt! Warum soll der menschl.
Organismus im Bedarfsfall diese Helferchen nicht selbst herstellen können?
Woher kommt der erste Infizierte?
Vielleicht können jetzt auch mal die Damen und Herren des anderen Lagers
zur Kenntnis nehmen, dass es durchaus eine andere Interpretation der Fakten
geben kann, und dass sich hier gerade eine neue, andere und vor allem
rundere Sicht der Dinge ergibt! Wenn denen, die am herkömmlichen Weltbild
festhalten wollen, nichts mehr anderes bleibt als Ausweichen, Ablenken,
Totschweigen, Überlesen, Polemik, Hass, Diffarmierung, dann bestärkt mich
das ungemein!
Zum Schluß noch eine interessante Bemerkung aus dem Titel SARS im Spiegel
dieser Woche (Seite 196): "Vielleicht bringt ja gar nicht das Virus die
Leute um, sondern ihr eigenes Immunsystem."
Na sowas! Was machen denn dann die Tests? Und mit welcher Berrechtigung
werden die Verdachtsfälle in ihren Wohnungen eingesperrt? Hier handelt es
sich um eine massive Verletzung der Grund- und Menschenrechte,
gerechtfertigt durch den sog. "Stand der Wissenschaft"!
Die größte Gefahr für die Demokratie geht weltweit von den
Gesundheitsbehörden aus, die im Zusammenbruch ihre Macht durch Verletzungen
der elementarsten Grundrechte beweisen müssen!
Grüße
Angelika

Antworten:
Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen Minerva 06.5.2003 11:13 (3)
Darum geht es hier gar nicht! Angelika Kögel-Schauz 06.5.2003 15:58 (2)
Re: Darum geht es hier gar nicht! Minerva 06.5.2003 17:53 (1)
Und hier endet dieses Gespräch! Moderatorin 06.5.2003 18:22 (0)
@Catherina Angelika Kögel-Schauz 06.5.2003 10:42 (7)
Re: @Catherina Catherina 06.5.2003 10:58 (6)
Re: @Catherina Angelika Kögel-Schauz 06.5.2003 11:22 (5)
Re: @Catherina DDr. Maurer 06.5.2003 12:17 (4)
Was sagt die Physik dazu? Bernd 08.5.2003 22:45 (1)
Re: Was sagt die Physik dazu? DDr. Maurer 09.5.2003 09:15 (0)
Re: @Catherina Mario 08.5.2003 15:24 (1)
Re: @Catherina Catherina 08.5.2003 15:26 (0)
Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen Catherina 06.5.2003 09:04 (3)
Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen Strogi 06.5.2003 09:55 (2)
Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen nochmal ohne whoops Catherina 06.5.2003
10:22 (0)
Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen Catherina 06.5.2003 10:17 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

Rechnen kann sie auch nicht:

http://f24.parsimony.net/forum55247/messages/11485.htm
[Zitatanfang]
Darum geht es hier gar nicht!
[ Forum Impfen ]
Geschrieben von Angelika Kögel-Schauz am 06. Mai 2003 15:58:59:
Als Antwort auf: Re: Grundsätzliche Überlegungen geschrieben von Minerva am
06. Mai 2003 11:13:37:
Hallo Minerva,
wie ich geschrieben habe, ging es mir in diesem Fall nicht um den
Wirksamkeitsnachweis, sondern um die Verfahren bei der Herstellung. Die
Züchtung und Herstellung von Impstoffen erinnert nicht nur an eine
mittelalterliche Hexenküche, es würde den meisten Eltern wohl auf der
Stelle das Ko... kommen, wenn sie wüssten, oder gar gesehen hätte, wie
Impfstoffe hergestellt werden!
Da ist die verdünnte und potenzierte Hundescheiße aus dem nachbarlichen
Hassforum völlig harmlos. Ist doch chemisch gesehen eh nichts mehr drinnen
ab D3, oder so!
Grüße
Angelika
>"Die Herstellung von pflanzlichen oder homöopathischen Arzneimitteln ist eine völlig saubere nachvollziehbare Geschichte."
>Wo sind denn die Wirkungsnachweise? Die Pharmahexenküche hat für jedes Mittelchen, das sie auf dem Markt bringt, welche - die Homöopathie keinen einzigen.
>Außerdem halte ich es für falsch pflanzliche Arzneimittel in einem Zug mit Homöopathischen Mitteln zu nennen. Auch bei ersteren gibt es nämlich durchaus Wirkungsnachweise...
>viele Grüße
>Minerva

Antworten:
Re: Darum geht es hier gar nicht! Minerva 06.5.2003 17:53 (1)
Und hier endet dieses Gespräch! Moderatorin 06.5.2003 18:22 (0)
[ Forum Impfen ]
[Zitatende]

[Zitatende]
Ist doch chemisch gesehen eh nichts mehr drinnen ab D3, oder so!
[Zitatende]

Angelika Kögel-Schauz ist das Flagschiff der Impfgegner.

Kann nicht lesen.

Kann nicht rechnen.

Aber aufrufen zur Mißhandlung von Kindern durch vorsätzlich unterlassene
präventive medizinische Maßnahmen, das kann sie...

Menschenversuche mit Ebola, sofort!

RR
--
"Wir stehen zu den Prinzipien des Health on the Net Code of Conduct, einer
Selbstverpflichtung zu Qualität bei Gesundheits- und medizinischen
Informationen im World Wide Web und zur Wahrung ethischer Maximen."
Wie heißt noch mal dieser Informationsminister???
(Rhino Cero in d.s.m.m.)
[*/QUOTE*]

ama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1110
Unverträglichkeit
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2008, 05:19:22 PM »

push
Pages: [1]