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Author Topic: Der Holocaust war eine chirurgische Operation  (Read 2200 times)

ama

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Der Holocaust war eine chirurgische Operation
« on: June 05, 2007, 03:05:40 PM »

Der Holocaust war eine chirurgische Operation. Wer würde so einen Irrsinn sagen? Natürlich ein Nazi. Denkste! Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson hat das gesagt.

Sorry, liebe Haaretz, aber das MUSS ich wegen der Wahrheitsfindung vollständig zitieren:

http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/865718.html

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Mon., June 04, 2007
Sivan 18, 5767

God as surgeon

By Yehuda Bauer


The panel discussion on "Haredim and the Holocaust"
recently aired on Channel 1 should have included the
views of the Lubavitcher Rebbe (Chabad's so-called
"King Messiah"), Rabbi Menachem Schneerson.
On the subject of the Holocaust, the Rebbe wrote as
follows: "It is clear that 'no evil descends from Above,'
and buried within torment and suffering is a core of
exalted spiritual good. Not all human beings are able to
perceive it, but it is very much there. So it is not
impossible for the physical destruction of the Holocaust to
be spiritually beneficial. On the contrary, it is quite
possible that physical affliction is good for the spirit"

("Mada Ve'emuna," Machon Lubavitch, 1980, Kfar
Chabad).
 
Schneerson goes on to compare God to a surgeon who
amputates a patient's limb in order to save his life. The
limb "is incurably diseased ... The Holy One Blessed Be
He, like the professor-surgeon...seeks the good of Israel,
and indeed, all He does is done for the good.... In the
spiritual sense, no harm was done, because the everlasting
spirit of the Jewish people was not destroyed."

The Rebbe's stance, therefore, is clear: The
Holocaust was a good thing because it
lopped off a disease-ravaged limb of the Jewish people -
in other words, the millions who perished in the Holocaust
- in order to cleanse the Jewish people of its sins.
There is logic in this theology: If God is indeed
omnipotent, knows everything and controls the world
("God presides over the trials of 4 billion people all day
long, every day without a moment's rest"), which implies
divine supervision on an individual and collective basis,
then the Holocaust took place not only with his knowledge,
but also with his approval.

Schneerson does not accept the idea of "hester panim," or
God's face being turned away, to explain why He was not
present when 1.5 million Jewish children were murdered.
According to some religious Jews, this hester panim was a
consequence of man's sins, and, above all, the sins of the
Jewish people. Schneerson says that God was there, and
that he wanted the Holocaust to happen. But because it is
inconceivable, in his view, for God to commit evil, he
portrays the Holocaust as a positive event, all the more so
for the Jews.

After this text was published in the summer of 1980,
kicking up a storm, Chabad claimed it was based on an
inaccurate Hebrew translation of talks that the Rebbe
delivered in Yiddish. The Rebbe, they said, had no idea
his remarks were being published. It seems hard to believe
Schneerson would not go over every word published in
his name, let alone a text put out in Hebrew by Machon
Lubavitch in Kfar Chabad.

In fact, there is a document written by the Rebbe himself,
in Hebrew, which bears his statements about the
Holocaust. The late Chaika Grossman, a leader of the
underground in the Bialystok ghetto, who survived the war
and served as a Knesset member for several terms,
published an article in Hamishmar newspaper on August
22, 1980, quoting Schneerson and expressing her profound
shock at his words. On August 28, 1980, the Rebbe sent
her a reply on his personal stationary. The letter,
apparently typewritten, contains a number of corrections in
his own handwriting, and is signed by him. In it, the Rebbe
confirms everything in the published text.

His remarks, Schneerson explained, were based on the
Torah. Hitler was a messenger of God in the same sense
that Nebuchadnezzar is called "God's servant" in the Book
of Jeremiah (chapter 25). The "surgery" he spoke of was
such a massive corrective procedure that the suffering
(i.e., the murder of the Jews) was minor compared to its
curative effect.

I was invited to take part in this television debate, but my
appearance was canceled at the last moment, perhaps
because of my opinions on the subject. The truth is, there
are no "Haredim." There are Haredi groups and Haredi
individuals, and their conduct during and after the
Holocaust took different forms. Since the Holocaust, Jews
have wrestled with this issue and continue to do so. Rabbi
Schneerson's views are one of many.
But Chabad is a large and influential Hasidic dynasty. It
has a messiah who lived and died, and many look forward
to his resurrection. In this respect, Chabad is a kind of
semi-Christian movement. Therefore it is important to
know what its leader said. The "King Messiah" did not
deny the Holocaust. He justified it.


The author is a Holocaust scholar.

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Ob Rabbi Ryke Geerd Hamer demnächst vom Papst heilig gesprochen wird? Zutrauen würde ich es beiden...









Eine gute Quelle: http://www.failedmessiah.typepad.com/
.
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