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Author Topic: Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an  (Read 1532 times)

ama

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Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an
« on: November 25, 2007, 08:33:56 PM »

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SPIEGEL ONLINE - 24. November 2007, 13:25
KLIMAWANDEL
Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an

Es wäre ein Deal der Superlative: Guyanas Präsident bietet Großbritannien ein Regenwald-Gebiet an, das größer als England ist - im Gegenzug will der südamerikanische Staat Entwicklungshilfe.

In der südamerikanischen Republik Guyana leben weniger Einwohner als in Köln, ihr Staat ist aber annäherend so groß wie Großbritannien: 214.969 Quadratkilometer. Regenwald bedeckt fast vier Fünftel dieser Fläche - daraus will Guyanas Präsident Bharrat Jagdeo nun Kapital schlagen.

In der britischen Tageszeitung " The Independent" bietet er Großbritannien den Deal an: Die Briten verwalten über eine internationale Organisation das etwa 170.000 Quadratkilometer große Regenwald-Gebiet Guyanas und unterstützen im Gegenzug den Staat wirtschaftlich.
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mehr:
http://www.spiegel.de/wissenschaft/mensch/0,1518,519387,00.html



Hier das offizielle Angebot:

http://environment.independent.co.uk/climate_change/article3191500.ece

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Take over our rainforest
Guyana's extraordinary offer to Britain to save one of the world's most important carbon sinks

By Daniel Howden in Georgetown, Guyana
Published: 24 November 2007

Man-made climate change is a clear and present danger. Decision-makers from around the globe will converge on Bali in a fortnight in an attempt to do something about it. And the call has gone out for the world's leaders to take bold action to avoid a catastrophe.

Enter Guyana. The former British colony, sandwiched between Venezuela and Brazil, is home to fewer than a million people but it is also home to an intact rainforest larger than England. In a dramatic offer, the government of Guyana has said it is willing to place its entire standing forest under the control of a British-led, international body in return for a bilateral deal with the UK that would secure development aid and the technical assistance needed to make the change to a green economy.

The deal would represent potentially the largest carbon offset ever undertaken, securing the vast carbon sinks of Guyana's pristine forest in return for assisting the economic growth of South America's poorest economy.

Speaking in his office in the capital, Georgetown, on the Caribbean coast, Guyana's President, Bharrat Jagdeo, said the offer was a chance for Britain to make a "moral offset" and underline its leadership on the most important single issue facing the world – climate change. "We can deploy the forest against global warming and, through the UK's help, it wouldn't have to stymie development in Guyana."

Mr Jagdeo, 43, said he was "looking for a partner to sit across the table with" to work out the precise terms of any deal, without compromising the country's sovereignty. "We are a country with the political will and a large tract of standing forest. I'm not a mercenary, this is not blackmail and I realise there's no such thing as a free lunch. I'm not just doing this just because I'm a good man and want to save the world, I need the assistance."

Mr Jagdeo, an economist by training, did not envisage long-term support from the British taxpayer but said the British government could help by lending its backing to private sector investments through the emerging carbon markets. "The market should ultimately compensate countries but in the absence of this, this is the best thing on the table. It would send a strong message to Bali that standing forests matter," he said.

The existing rainforest reserve of Iwokrama in central Guyana has been mentioned as a model for what could be done countrywide. The million-acre reserve was gifted to the Commonwealth in 1989 as a showcase for how tropical forests could be managed to provide ecological and economic benefits. Scientists working there estimate it holds close to 120 million tons of carbon – an amount equivalent to the annual emissions of the UK.

David Singh, chief executive of Iwokrama, said Guyana's offer has to be taken seriously: "When a sovereign state does this, it's something the world needs to pay attention to. Nowhere else is a state willing to place its forest into the hands of the international community for protection."

The accelerating destruction of the rainforests that form a cooling band around the earth's equator is recognised as one the main causes of climate change. Tropical deforestation accounts for one fifth of all carbon emissions, more than the entire transport sector – including the aviation industry. The burning of trees pumps as much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere as the US and has pushed Indonesia and Brazil into the world's top four polluters. Despite this, efforts to avoid deforestation were not included in the Kyoto protocol. That agreement is expiring and the UN climate change conference in Bali next month is tasked with thrashing out a successor that will work. The landmark Stern Review concluded that forests offer the single largest chance for cost-effective and immediate reductions of carbon emissions.

But the gap between rhetoric and reality remains large for smaller nations such as Guyana. "It infuriates me when I hear lofty speeches and back-patting in the developed world," said Mr Jagdeo. "Despite Stern, we are wondering whether they really believe that avoiding deforestation is the most cost-effective way to combat climate change."

Hylton Murray-Philipson, the head of London-based Rainforest Concern, said a deal could be a breakthrough. "In the absence of an international agreement, an early action by enlightened leaders should be greatly welcomed. Business as usual is not going to work." The former investment banker, who is working to bring funding into developing carbon markets, said: "It's insanity that a single service company, Google, has a market value of $200bn, while all the services of all of the world's great forests are valued at nothing."

Guyana is the only English-speaking country in South America and, with its history in the sugar trade and Caribbean links, is primarily a coastal culture. With a population of only around 750,000 in a country almost as big as the entire UK, it combines dense, species-rich forests with low population pressure.

But the soaring price of timber and gold, which is mined from forested areas, means pressure to exploit its most obvious resource is building. A Brazilian plan is on the drawing board to build a paved highway through the rainforest, a move that could turn Georgetown into a major port and change the face of the country. "Maybe we should just cut down the trees. Then someone would recognise the problem," said Mr Jagdeo. "But I want to think we can fulfil our people's aspirations without cutting down the trees."

Mr Jagdeo said the UK's leading role in achieving debt relief for Third World countries had inspired him to make the offer to London: "Ordinary people in Britain, the churches and NGOs put the issue squarely on the agenda. Then the British Government championed debt relief. This would send a signal that we are prepared to go beyond Kyoto. It could be a symbol of what can be done."

Iwokrama: the prototype which prospered

The outline of the Iwokrama rainforest reserve cannot be seen from the air. The green ocean of the forest canopy stretches uninterrupted in every direction. But the sanctuary, which takes its name from the language of the local Makushi people and means "place of refuge", is there and it's an extraordinary place.

Part of the Guyana Shield, one of the last four intact rainforests left in the world, it is home to mountains, 200 lakes, rivers flowing over volcanic dykes, lowland tropical rainforests and palm forests. The forest shelters some of the world's most endangered species, including the jaguar, harpy eagle, giant anteater, giant river otter, anaconda, black caiman and giant river turtle.

Iwokrama is more than a reserve. It is a living laboratory where science, conservation, tourism, biodiversity and the needs of the local community have come together in an experiment to sustainably manage the forest. It was set up after Guyana offered the one million acre site to the international community in 1989 and is run by local and foreign staff. David Singh, a Guyanese conservationist who has run the centre for three years, is convinced the experiment has been a success. "We have learnt how to do it and how not to do it – which is often the most expensive lesson," he says. "The international community could transform the way we use forests."

The centre attracted heavy funding in its early years but has struggled more recently as overseas donors shifted their attention from sustainable development into HIV and Aids projects. The scope of the scientific work undertaken at the reserve's field station has been scaled back and Guyana's government had to plunder its own meagre budget two years ago to keep the reserve going.

But the increasing attention now being paid to climate change is starting to make Iwokrama look like a project ahead of its time as it seeks to solve the conundrum of making its trees worth more standing up than they would be if they were cut down.

A mixture of eco-tourism, non-timber products and business ventures such as a butterfly farm are bringing in an income. Ron Allicock, a Makushi ranger at the centre, said: "People come here thinking the forest is empty, that the place is just full of trees. But it is also our home."

He thinks Iwokrama could be a model for getting it right in forests around the world: "We've got to fix the small place first to show we can fix the big place."
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Ich denke, der Mann hat Größe. Jetzt ist es an den Briten, die ihre zu zeigen.
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« Last Edit: November 25, 2007, 08:34:48 PM by ama »
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Kinderklinik Gelsenkirchen verstößt gegen die Leitlinien

Der Skandal in Gelsenkirchen
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http://www.klinikskandal.com

http://www.reimbibel.de/GBV-Kinderklinik-Gelsenkirchen.htm
http://www.kinderklinik-gelsenkirchen-kritik.de

ama

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Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2007, 08:55:03 PM »

http://www.op.gov.gy/archives/archives_new.htm

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Contact us

Office of the President
New Garden Street, Georgetown. Guyana. South America
Tel# (592) 225-1330-8 or (592) - 226-7811
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Kinderklinik Gelsenkirchen verstößt gegen die Leitlinien

Der Skandal in Gelsenkirchen
Hamer-Anhänger in der Kinderklinik
http://www.klinikskandal.com

http://www.reimbibel.de/GBV-Kinderklinik-Gelsenkirchen.htm
http://www.kinderklinik-gelsenkirchen-kritik.de

ama

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Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2007, 09:07:46 PM »

Die Berichte sind zu sehr gefärbt, sowohl die in deutschen als auch den britschen Zeitungen.

Hier am Stück der Originalton von "Guyanachronicle.com ..... Guyana's premier online paper" aus Guayana:

http://www.guyanachronicle.com/topstory.html

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Top Stories for Sunday, November 25, 2007

PRESIDENT JAGDEO STRESSES URGENT ACTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

International Attention Focuses on Guyana’s Initiative, as President Emphasises that National Sovereignty and Control over the Rainforest will be Protected

President Bharrat Jagdeo has called on Heads of Government and global business leaders to recognise that the global threat from climate change requires sustained attention from the world’s most senior political and corporate decision-makers. He also emphasised that developing countries must ensure that their voices are heard at the upcoming negotiations on a successor agreement to the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change, which will take place in Bali, Indonesia in December.

Addressing Heads of Government, about 500 business leaders and government officials in Kampala, Uganda, the President emphasised the need for solutions to provide incentives for avoiding deforestation to be placed at the heart of a comprehensive agreement on climate change. Tropical deforestation causes about 18% of global emissions of greenhouse gases – about the same as India and China combined, or the combined total of the entire transport sector, including aviation.

He told the audience of Guyana’s willingness to identify mechanisms whereby the country’s rainforest, which is the size of England, can be deployed in the global battle against climate change. The President emphasised that rainforest countries could not be expected to sacrifice their economic development in order to combat climate change on behalf of the world. However, he said that he believed that ways could be found to balance sustainable forestry management practices with ground-breaking initiatives to support the global battle against climate change.

President Jagdeo was addressing the closing session of the Commonwealth Business Forum, which took place immediately before the start of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting. The Business Forum brought together leaders to discuss issues which impact on the competitiveness of Commonwealth countries and their ability to attract investment and support economic growth.

Speaking afterwards, the President emphasised that Guyana’s offer will not involve the ceding of sovereignty over Guyana’s territory. He said that the identification of the specific mechanisms for deploying the rainforest will take time, and that all ideas will be considered, whether proposed by domestic or international stakeholders. However, he indicated his expectation that the most sustainable long-term solution will involve the engagement of the global capital markets. The President said that a market-based approach is more likely to devise long-term workable solutions. According to the President, these solutions will not involve the termination of economic activities within the forest - these will continue to be supported provided that they are carried out in a manner which is compatible with sustainable forestry management practices.

His climate change initiative that he presented at the Commonwealth Business Forum was the same climate change initiative that he first unveiled in his speech at the Opening Ceremony of the Commonwealth Finance Ministers’ Meeting in Georgetown in October 2007; and which generated considerable media attention.

The President’s announcement of his willingness to discuss how Guyana’s rainforest can be deployed in the service of the world’s battle against climate change was the front-page story in the prestigious London-based Independent newspaper, and received extensive coverage on Sky News and the BBC. The President’s offer was described by the Independent as “a groundbreaking step in the battle against climate change.”

Leading climate change activists have also come out in support, with Hylton Murray, the head of the London-based Rainforest Concern saying “In the absence of an international agreement, an early action by enlightened leaders should be greatly welcomed. Business as usual is not going to work.” Murray, who is working to bring funding into developing carbon markets, also said “It is insanity that a single service company, Google, has a market value of $200 billion, while all the services of all the world’s great forests are valued at nothing.”

Quoted in the Independent, President Jagdeo said that he “was looking for a partner to sit across the table with” to work out the precise terms of any deal – “we are a country with the political will and a large tract of a standing forest. I’m not a mercenary, this is not blackmail and I realise there’s no such thing as a free lunch…” However, he emphasised that “We can deploy the forest against global warming and … it wouldn’t have to stymie development in Guyana.”

Increases, backpay before Christmas
Finance Minister signs orders
MINISTER of Finance Dr. Ashni Singh has signed orders under the Constitutional Offices (Remuneration of Holders) Act and the Ministers, Members of the National Assembly and Special Offices (Emoluments) Act, granting approval for a nine percent salary increase with effect from January 1, 2007 to holders of offices covered by those Acts.            

Minister Singh will be tabling those Orders in Parliament at the next sitting scheduled for Thursday, following the approval of the increase for public servants, teachers, and the disciplined services.

The Ministry of Finance has been working assiduously to accelerate the process to ensure that the salary increases for these categories of workers are paid as quickly as possible. Instructions have been issued requiring submission by the various agencies and departments to the Ministry of Finance to request release of the funds required to pay the increases. These submissions were expected to have been made by Wednesday, November 21.

Teachers and members of the Disciplined Services are expected to receive their increases and retroactive pay with their November salary, while public servants are set to receive their retroactive payment with their December salaries.

In an invited comment, Minister Singh emphasised the importance of the heads of the respective agencies ensuring that the submissions and requests for funds are prepared accurately, are submitted to the Ministry of Finance immediately if they have not already been submitted, and that any queries that might arise are responded to immediately in order to ensure that the staff are paid on time.

Minister Singh also stated that the combined November and December wage bill of the Central Government, including retroactive payments, is expected to be more than $5 billion. This generates a very significant injection of disposable income, and impacts favourably on private consumption and on commercial activity in the economy.

“It takes on an added importance to the recipients given the imminence of the Christmas season, and employees quite rightly and understandably look forward to receiving their entitlements on time. It is therefore extremely important that the staff involved in this activity ensure that it is completed swiftly, and that everyone is paid in a timely manner and before the Christmas holiday”, Minister Singh said. (GINA)


Thank You For Visiting Guyanachronicle.com ...... Guyana's premier online paper......Do come again..........    

Copyright GNNL June 2007 - Designed, Developed and Maintained by GNNL MIS Department
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Das geht ALLE an, JEDEN von uns! Vielleicht können wir auf diese Weise einen direkten Kontakt herstellen.


Was in Großbritannien - und auch bei uns - vor sich geht, zeigen auch diese Zahlen:

In Guayana sind im Urwald 120 Millionen Tonnen Kohlenstoff gebunden. Das ist die gleiche Menge, die in Großbritannien PRO JAHR in die Luft gefeuert wird...

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Kinderklinik Gelsenkirchen verstößt gegen die Leitlinien

Der Skandal in Gelsenkirchen
Hamer-Anhänger in der Kinderklinik
http://www.klinikskandal.com

http://www.reimbibel.de/GBV-Kinderklinik-Gelsenkirchen.htm
http://www.kinderklinik-gelsenkirchen-kritik.de

Moses2

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Re: Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2019, 08:56:59 AM »

Im Zeichen und dem Damoklesschwert von BREXIT wäre das eine wieder überdenkenswerte Idee.
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Save the Whales! Rule the Seas!

Krokant

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Re: Guyana bietet Großbritannien seinen Regenwald an
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2019, 05:06:53 AM »

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